Arguing the pros and cons of a Caterham that (in test-driven trim) exceeds the starting price of a Porsche Cayman S is a decidedly dicey business.

It could be persuasively argued that, given the basic materials involved, no Seven has the right to be so costly – no matter what its performance potential may be.

Nic Cackett

Nic Cackett

Road tester
The swap from ‘racing’ to ‘sports’ suspension makes the 620S more pliant and balanced on the road

However, to the right buyer, such an argument would be as redundant as pointing out that you would get more days use per year from Porsche’s coupé or far more luggage space.

The niche-within-a-niche customer tends to be clinically disinterested in practical or economic concerns – and Caterham doubtless understands this type of potential owner well enough by now to know how much it might charge them for indulging their high-end fanaticism.

Nevertheless, one commonsensical item ought to remain of interest: the 620S, courtesy of its supercharger, comes with a thirst.

The cost of the petrol may not be important to some potential owners, but the impact of 25mpg average economy on the model’s touring range might be.

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For a Seven well capable of cruising, the potential (needle-indicated) draining of the 32-litre tank in 135 miles means visiting petrol stations far more frequently than one would in a more modest Caterham. It’s hardly a fatal or surprising blow but worth considering if you had serious touring in mind.

However, if you are serious of buying the 620S and nothing will sway you otherwise, then we would spec it up with a narrower body, heated carbonfibre seats, black 13in alloys and a quick release steering wheel to complete the package.

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