Our market analysts think the RS4 will retain some of the strongest residual values in the Audi range – stronger even than the BMW M3 coupé.

Fitted with the carbon-ceramic front brakes of our test car, it also resisted wearing through its consumables admirably during its time with us. It spent days on a circuit for a road test and our previous Best Driver’s Car feature, during which it steadfastly refused to burn through its tyres and brakes.

Matt Prior

Matt Prior

Road test editor
The RS4 retains more than 45 percent of its value over four years. That’s good, even in this class

It did, however, burn through quite a lot of petrol, as 32.4mpg even on our relatively gentle touring route would suggest. That might limit its appeal in the eyes of some buyers but, if you can live with the fuel consumption, it remains one of the most intoxicating drivetrains around.

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