We catch up with two future owners of the Tesla Model 3

The Tesla Model 3 has now been officially launched - and we've caught up with two future owners, Russell Harper and Nick Peaty, to find out why they have joined the 500,000-strong group of customers to put down deposits for the car. 

“The Model 3 is the first affordable box-ticking electric car; in terms of price, range, quality, brand, up until now the choice has been limited. The Model 3 starts to change the game,” says Harper, when asked what the appeal of the Model 3 is. “I put down a deposit on day one. The Americans got in first because of time zones but made sure I got in as soon as I could from the UK. I even put down two deposits - one for me and one for my wife. We heard it would be very popular, and we weren’t wrong.

Read more details of the Tesla Model 3's performance and range figures, plus latest production details

“I’ve not owned a Tesla before, but I’ve been aware of the brand since 2014. I’ve read Elon Musk’s autobiography, and like lots of people, I guess I put blind faith in the car. It’s almost like Steve Jobs and the iPhone; the Model 3 will be the car to put Tesla in the spotlight."

Not all prospective Model 3 owners are first-timers, though - Peaty is more than familiar with Musk’s product portfolio: “I had a Model S when they first came out. I then had a Model X which I will continue to run alongside the Model 3 - the 3 will be for my wife. It’s slightly smaller, a lot cheaper, and will replace her Nissan Leaf. Range is restrictive with Leaf, we need something with a few more miles, as the range on the Leaf is not good enough for some of the journeys she wants to do. It’s remarkable that the Model 3 is the same price as the Leaf - that’s a great thing, and it will be good to see what full UK specs offer.” 

Peaty was also keen to get his name on the waiting list as soon as possible: “We were yet to see specs and UK price, but we put our deposit down on the day it was made available. Hopefully in a year’s time it’ll be a car that’s a fantastic investment. We have solar panels on the roof of our house, so won’t need to spend as much money charging the car as others.”

What about the more conventional end of the market, then? Why not a BMW 3 Series? Harper blames a gap in the market: “Potential EV owners are ready for something different. We’ve been used to combustion engines for so long, that people think having an electric car and loving cars is incompatible but that’s not the case. People are ready for something more environmentally friendly.”

Peaty is more aware of the problems with diesel: “We believed in Tesla being able to deliver something that offers an alternative to smelly diesels. It’s clear to see that they can deliver; naysayers stand corrected, they made a large SUV with 300 miles of range, they’ve delivered on superchargers, and we know they can deliver a car for £35,000 exceeding what BMW and Audi can do in the same price point. It needs to be a joy to drive and have an unlimited mile warranty.”

Could anything change the opinions of our prospective owners? “Nothing could put me off; I’m expecting Tesla to continue to over-deliver on its promises,” says Peaty. 

Read more: 

Tesla Model 3: first customer delivery to take place tonight

Tesla Model 3 sold out for first 12 months of production

Tesla: "Model 3 is not the next-generation Tesla"

Tesla Model 3 to be revealed

Tesla Model S review

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Comments
14

28 July 2017

Nice to hear comments from both new and a repeat customer. There can't be many 2 car owning familes out there that have 2 EV. It's kind of been my argument when whinners harp on about the need to do 250 miles in a day, for 2 car owning familes that's just not a problem and lets face it most 3 series, model 3 buyers will have access to a second car which should be petrol. Note I said MOST

 

Hydrogen cars just went POP

28 July 2017

Facebook, Google and Apple have all been accused of spying on users in a fashion similar to methods used by America's National Security Agency (NSA). How can we trust other tech companies such as Tesla?

We already know that Tesla collects a ton of data from each vehicle they sell, which they currently claim is to “improve our vehicles and services for you”. For those that don’t know, Tesla only give examples of the information they collect, but admit to collecting the following: vehicle identification number, speed information, odometer readings, battery use management information, battery charging history, electrical system functions, software version information; infotainment system data, safety-related data and camera images (including, e.g., information regarding the vehicle’s SRS systems, braking and acceleration, security, e-brake, and accidents), short video clips, information regarding the use and operation of Autopilot, Summon, and other features. They further claim they may collect such information either in person (such as during a service appointment) or via remote access.

Some may like the idea of Tesla being the future, but I can understand those who are concerned.

28 July 2017
So how much is the real price of the car? So many articles, not one with a price.

28 July 2017
Camoron wrote:

So how much is the real price of the car? So many articles, not one with a price.

Because the price hasn't been revealed yet.

28 July 2017

They haven't reavaled pricing yet. I assume they will do so tonight.

The Last Roses

28 July 2017
Camoron wrote:

So how much is the real price of the car? So many articles, not one with a price.

Musk said he thought the entry-level price would work out to £30k or slightly less in Britain, but this was before Brexit when the pound was somewhat stronger. Hopefully we'll find out more in the morning.

29 July 2017
So the first customers are basically just paying whatever Tesla say it is? :D

30 July 2017
Camoron wrote:

So the first customers are basically just paying whatever Tesla say it is? :D

The deposits are refundable, so they don't have to pay it. Looking at Model S pricing, I'd expect the base Model 3 to work out to £31k.

29 July 2017

Maybe this has been explained somewhere else at some point but Ive not seen any explanations... Why go Model S, Model X and then Model 3? It doesn't fit the naming strategy. Or are they going to rename the other models when replacements come along? 

CDN

29 July 2017

It was rumoured to have been names Model E originally but Ford objected because of the Model T. There's thinking that Ford might launch an EV sub brand with a Model E as well. I like how they got around that by having the 3 horizontal bars that look like a stylized E.   

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