Currently reading: Next Skoda Octavia vRS to go hybrid
Alongside hybrid models, Skoda also has plans for pure electric RS models
Rachel Burgess
News
2 mins read
5 October 2018

The next-generation Octavia vRS, arriving by 2021, will have a hybrid variant to sit alongside internal-combustion engine options such as petrol or diesel.

Talking about a hybrid powertrain on the next Octavia, Christian Strube, Skoda R&D boss said: “Octavia is a good possibility. Perhaps in an RS version - because it’s a good mix between sustainability [and performance]. If you drive 70km, you can drive everyday to work electrified and if you want to haves some fun at the weekend you have an RS version. It’s really nice.”

Skoda is launching its first plug-in hybrid next year in its Superb model. Strube said the PHEV would be “more or less” the same powertrain as previewed in the Vision RS concept shown at the Paris motor show.

This combines a 148bhp 1.5-litre turbo petrol engine and a 101bhp electric motor to give a total output of 242bhp and a claimed 0-62mph time of 7.1sec.

An Octavia vRS hybrid would use a similar set-up but naturally get more overall power to make it performance-car-worthy.

The fastest current Octavia vRS is a 242bhp petrol and achieves the benchmark sprint in 6.6secs. Any future model will no doubt look to trump that time.

The only RS models currently on sale are the Octavia vRS and the new Kodiaq vRS.

There is no word on other RS models but a Karoq RS has been mooted. Strube said he would like to see one in the upcoming Rapid replacement, previewed in the Vision RS concept. “I think this fits perfectly. But you could also do one on the Superb.

“We are selling a lot of RS. I have two directions: to push the development for sustainability, such as electrification and on the other side, of course, I’m pushing all these RS versions because these makes the brand much much more emotional which is important for economical sustainability.”

Skoda also has plans for pure electric RS models. Sales and marketing boss Alain Favey has previously told Autocar a performance version of its upcoming electric SUV will arrive in 2022 likely badged eRS.

Ahead of the next-generation Octavia vRS arriving, the fourth-generation Octavia will launch by 2020. The model is easily Skoda’s biggest selling car so is crucial to its success.

The standard Octavia is also set to get a plug-in hybrid powertrain as one of five electrified vehicles confirmed by the brand to arrive by 2020.

Read more 

Skoda electric SUV confirmed under development 

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si73 6 October 2018

I would happily pay the extra

I would happily pay the extra for the hybrid, as yet I haven't driven a car that I haven't enjoyed, be that manual or auto, petrol, diesel, hybrid or electric, There have been some that I have enjoyed more obviously but with regards to the vrs, I'd happily have the hybrid for the benefits it brings and more than likely enjoy driving it.

scotty5 5 October 2018

ICE or Hybrid

I bought a 1.4tsi Octavia last year because I preferred it to the 2.0tsi vRS. But if my choice was limited to either 2.0tsi or Hybrid, I'd happily spend £2000 of my own cash on the hybrid version.

 

xxxx 5 October 2018

so

3-0 then. Anyone out there favour a Hybrid DSG over the ICE vRS DSG version?

Ubberfrancis44 5 October 2018

xxxx wrote:

xxxx wrote:

3-0 then. Anyone out there favour a Hybrid DSG over the ICE vRS DSG version?

I would go for the hybrid in a lease deal, which is how most cars are sold nowadays. The pure electric range would make the car bulletproof if any cities decided to have electric only zones, and I woukd still have just as much fun with the ICE elsewhere.

xxxx 5 October 2018

3-1

Ubberfrancis44 wrote:
xxxx wrote:

3-0 then. Anyone out there favour a Hybrid DSG over the ICE vRS DSG version?

I would go for the hybrid in a lease deal, which is how most cars are sold nowadays. The pure electric range would make the car bulletproof if any cities decided to have electric only zones, and I woukd still have just as much fun with the ICE elsewhere.

I was taking about private purchase. The extra weight and complexity would take away the fun for me. Anyway I'll chalk up your preference presuming you're ok with the extra on the RRSP  

p.s. Cities won't ban petrol without several years notice so you'd be safe on that front.   

FMS 6 October 2018

xxxx wrote:

xxxx wrote:

Ubberfrancis44 wrote:
xxxx wrote:

3-0 then. Anyone out there favour a Hybrid DSG over the ICE vRS DSG version?

I would go for the hybrid in a lease deal, which is how most cars are sold nowadays. The pure electric range would make the car bulletproof if any cities decided to have electric only zones, and I woukd still have just as much fun with the ICE elsewhere.

I was taking about private purchase. The extra weight and complexity would take away the fun for me. Anyway I'll chalk up your preference presuming you're ok with the extra on the RRSP  

p.s. Cities won't ban petrol without several years notice so you'd be safe on that front.   

 

Did you mention that you MEANT private purchase beforehand? TwIT

Cobnapint 5 October 2018

Electric only isn't hybrid

And in any case, your batteries might be flat by the time you reached said city, so you'll be pumping out more pollution trying to charge the bloody things up.

Halcyon 5 October 2018

xxxx wrote:

xxxx wrote:

3-0 then. Anyone out there favour a Hybrid DSG over the ICE vRS DSG version?

The plug-in hybrid might be significantly more economical, depending on the local taxation and legislation. In my home country (Finland) for example, the CO2 based tax on a petrol vRS is about 9000 € (added to purchase price) and for a plug-in hybrid this tax would be about 2000 €. So, even if the hybrid has a couple grand higher tax-free price, the overall price will be a lot cheaper. For example, all Volvo T8 models (hybrid, 400 hp) are cheaper to buy than T6 models (petrol, 320 hp). The choice is easy, of course we take the model that has more power and is cheaper to buy AND we also save in fuel and yearly car tax. Plus, if ICE cars are one day banned from city centers, we can still drive there when you are forced to park your ICE vRS outside the city and use the bus :-)

Summa summarum, I counted that the situation is 5-3 for the hybrid.

   

 

xxxx 5 October 2018

3-2

Halcyon wrote:

xxxx wrote:

3-0 then. Anyone out there favour a Hybrid DSG over the ICE vRS DSG version?

The plug-in hybrid might be significantly more economical, depending on the local taxation and legislation. In my home country (Finland) for example, the CO2 based tax on a petrol vRS is about 9000 € (added to purchase price) and for a plug-in hybrid this tax would be about 2000 €. So, even if the hybrid has a couple grand higher tax-free price, the overall price will be a lot cheaper. For example, all Volvo T8 models (hybrid, 400 hp) are cheaper to buy than T6 models (petrol, 320 hp). The choice is easy, of course we take the model that has more power and is cheaper to buy AND we also save in fuel and yearly car tax. Plus, if ICE cars are one day banned from city centers, we can still drive there when you are forced to park your ICE vRS outside the city and use the bus :-)

Summa summarum, I counted that the situation is 5-3 for the hybrid.

Emm not to sure on tax rules in Finland.  But if it wasn't for tax reasons in Finland would you spend £2,000 extra on a Hybrid?

Also people talk of a ban on petrol in Cities but I reckon a change in tax laws is way more likely when the tax man cottons on people/companies make the choice for tax reasons not environmental (especially a performance cars) 

Not sure where you got the 5-3, there haven't even been 8 replies

Anyway if it was your own cash (discount varying taxes) would you spend £2,000 extra and have the Hybrid

FMS 6 October 2018

xxxx wrote:

xxxx wrote:

Halcyon wrote:

xxxx wrote:

3-0 then. Anyone out there favour a Hybrid DSG over the ICE vRS DSG version?

The plug-in hybrid might be significantly more economical, depending on the local taxation and legislation. In my home country (Finland) for example, the CO2 based tax on a petrol vRS is about 9000 € (added to purchase price) and for a plug-in hybrid this tax would be about 2000 €. So, even if the hybrid has a couple grand higher tax-free price, the overall price will be a lot cheaper. For example, all Volvo T8 models (hybrid, 400 hp) are cheaper to buy than T6 models (petrol, 320 hp). The choice is easy, of course we take the model that has more power and is cheaper to buy AND we also save in fuel and yearly car tax. Plus, if ICE cars are one day banned from city centers, we can still drive there when you are forced to park your ICE vRS outside the city and use the bus :-)

Summa summarum, I counted that the situation is 5-3 for the hybrid.

Emm not to sure on tax rules in Finland.  But if it wasn't for tax reasons in Finland would you spend £2,000 extra on a Hybrid?

Also people talk of a ban on petrol in Cities but I reckon a change in tax laws is way more likely when the tax man cottons on people/companies make the choice for tax reasons not environmental (especially a performance cars) 

Not sure where you got the 5-3, there haven't even been 8 replies

Anyway if it was your own cash (discount varying taxes) would you spend £2,000 extra and have the Hybrid

 

Emmm, what are you sure about?...your continuing unemployment, must be a priority for you. TwIT

Halcyon 8 October 2018

xxxx wrote:

xxxx wrote:

But if it wasn't for tax reasons in Finland would you spend £2,000 extra on a Hybrid?

Maybe, maybe not. I could probably save the difference in fuel, but there could be some expensive repairs due to the complicated technology. Can't say for sure which I would chose in this case, but if the taxation is factored in, I would definitely go for the hybrid. This shows that this kind of taxation works; it steers people to buy more environmental friendly cars and that's why goverments will continue building even more progressive CO2 based taxes (unfortunately)

xxxx wrote:

Not sure where you got the 5-3, there haven't even been 8 replies

Sorry, we counted this differently. I counted pros and cons for the hybrid

pros

+ Cheaper purchase price (due to taxation)

+ More power (the Volvo example)

+ Better fuel efficiency

+ Lower yearly car tax

+ immune to city center ICE bans

cons

- More technology (more parts that can break)

- More weight (inferior driving dynamics)

- No manual (issue for some people)