New Mercedes-Benz GLB will spawn an electric variant in 2021; first production-previewing prototypes have now emerged
19 September 2019

Mercedes-Benz will launch an electric version of its new GLB compact SUV in 2021, named the EQB, and more production-like prototypes have now been seen testing.

Previously only seen underneath hacked test mules, the EQB is shown in the new images with altered and disguised front and rear end and similar aerodynamically-optimised wheels as the larger EQC

In a move similar to that undertaken with the GLC and its electrically powered sibling, the GLB will provide the basis for the zero-emission EQB model. It will feature uniquely styled front and rear ends, dedicated wheel designs and other detailed design changes that are said to lower its drag coefficient below 0.30Cd.

The EQB is set for UK sales in two years' time and has been conceived to run a further-developed version of the driveline destined for the upcoming EQA hatchback. It will use two electric motors, with one powering the front wheels and the other driving the rear wheels. Little is known about the new model, but insiders say it will have a battery of at least 60kWh in capacity and manage a claimed range of around 310 miles. 

The GLB is the eighth model to be based around Mercedes' MFA II platform, and it shares its wheelbase with the China-only long-wheelbase A-Class Saloon. At 2789mm, its wheelbase is 60mm longer than those of the other new A-Class models, while a relatively long rear overhang ensures the GLB provides more luggage space than the original GLA. It's not clear yet whether the EQB will retain the GLB's seven-seat option.

Alongside the EQB, Mercedes also plans to introduce a plug-in petrol-electric hybrid system in the GLC for a claimed electric-only range of 62 miles. It will use a 2.0-litre four-cylinder petrol engine and a gearbox-mounted electric motor to power the front wheels, along with a second motor mounted within a ZF-produced rear axle assembly to power the rear wheels. Energy for the motors is provided by a lithium ion battery packaged within the floor. 

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Both models are core parts of parent firm Daimler's massive electrification project, in which Mercedes will invest £9bn to produce 130 electrified variants by 2025. The flagship of this range will be the EQS, an electric sibling of the next-generation S-Class. 

Read more:

New Mercedes-Benz Vision EQS Concept is 470bhp luxury EV

Mercedes to follow EQC with nine EVs in four years

Electric SUV megatest: Mercedes EQC vs luxury rivals

 

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Comments
16

14 January 2019

 Where’s it all going to end?, so many choices within just one brand, is it a good idea?, or, just confusing?

Peter Cavellini.

14 January 2019
Peter Cavellini wrote:

 Where’s it all going to end?, so many choices within just one brand, is it a good idea?, or, just confusing?

The market will decide. I suspect you know the answer, the UK is only one of many markets so there is plenty of room for all the current models and more.

FM8

14 January 2019
Peter Cavellini wrote:

 Where’s it all going to end?, so many choices within just one brand, is it a good idea?, or, just confusing?

For the manufacturer, it's not about providing choice to the customer. It's about catering for the next trend. Many models, all based around as few platforms as possible with multiple power train choices, as customers shift from one big thing to the next, you already have a model there waiting. It's JLR's biggest failure and the sole reason for the situation they currently find themselves in.

14 January 2019
FM8 wrote:
Peter Cavellini wrote:

 Where’s it all going to end?, so many choices within just one brand, is it a good idea?, or, just confusing?

For the manufacturer, it's not about providing choice to the customer. It's about catering for the next trend. Many models, all based around as few platforms as possible with multiple power train choices, as customers shift from one big thing to the next, you already have a model there waiting. It's JLR's biggest failure and the sole reason for the situation they currently find themselves in.

...er except it’s not JLRs biggest failure. Their biggest failure is not building more capacity in China to make cars for the local market and escape Donald Trumps Trade war tarrifs.

Their next biggest failure is not making enough hybrids and prioritising Diesel sales. To be fair they aren’t a long way of having them and in electric cars are ahead of Mercedes and Audi.

Indeed JLR make plenty of models in plenty of niches. When the new Defender joins the range they will have the most complete range of ICE SUVs of any car maker.  The could make more regular cars and sportscars but why bother? Sales are falling like a stone for these types of vehicle.

to be honest a lot is made of JLRs problems right now but if the US agrees a trade deal with China and JLR keep going with their hybrid and electric car plans then by the end of this year they will be through the worst of it. Their biggest problem by far is being a relatively small car maker. Tata really should look st an automotive merger.

FM8

14 January 2019
TStag wrote:

FM8 wrote:
Peter Cavellini wrote:

 Where’s it all going to end?, so many choices within just one brand, is it a good idea?, or, just confusing?

For the manufacturer, it's not about providing choice to the customer. It's about catering for the next trend. Many models, all based around as few platforms as possible with multiple power train choices, as customers shift from one big thing to the next, you already have a model there waiting. It's JLR's biggest failure and the sole reason for the situation they currently find themselves in.

...er except it’s not JLRs biggest failure. Their biggest failure is not building more capacity in China to make cars for the local market and escape Donald Trumps Trade war tarrifs.

Their next biggest failure is not making enough hybrids and prioritising Diesel sales. To be fair they aren’t a long way of having them and in electric cars are ahead of Mercedes and Audi.

Indeed JLR make plenty of models in plenty of niches. When the new Defender joins the range they will have the most complete range of ICE SUVs of any car maker.  The could make more regular cars and sportscars but why bother? Sales are falling like a stone for these types of vehicle.

to be honest a lot is made of JLRs problems right now but if the US agrees a trade deal with China and JLR keep going with their hybrid and electric car plans then by the end of this year they will be through the worst of it. Their biggest problem by far is being a relatively small car maker. Tata really should look st an automotive merger.

You go and compare model line ups from JLR, BMW and Mercedes, body styles, variants, engine/powertrain availability, not just in the UK market, but global.  You'll understand how the German brands spread risk and you'll see how risk averse JLR is.  Trade wars, scaremongering over diesel, Brexit are simply market challenges which well mananged organisations cope with.

TATA does not need a merger for JLR, it needs better management.  The defender will do nothing for them other than see exisiting customer switch to it, as for conquest sales I doubt it will do much at all, it'll be just another overweight, over priced, diesel reliant variation of an existing model.

 

 

 

14 January 2019

Catering to the next trend isn't catering to the customer????

FM8

14 January 2019
SamVimes1972 wrote:

Catering to the next trend isn't catering to the customer????

Not necessarily. A lot of the time you have to tell the customer want they will want. SUV's are peaking, there's plenty of life left in sales but it's pretty much all been done now. Estates/wagons are the model we'll see pushed over the next few years, like most SUV's the can quickly and cost effectively be developed from existing saloons/hatchbacks but manufacturers can place significant premiums on the cost of them but incur very little additional cost themselves, increasing margins.

14 January 2019
Peter Cavellini wrote:

 Where’s it all going to end?, so many choices within just one brand, is it a good idea?, or, just confusing?

It depends. If you choose your car starting from the brand, as in, "I want a Mercedes that costs €40.000", then no. If you choose your car starting from features, e.g., I want a car that "is sleek" or "has a lot of space for a given footprint" or "has AWD" or "has an optional third row of spare seats" or "is hybrid" or things like these, then the more choice the better. Choosing a car is a pretty important decision so I don't think it's a problem to consider 7 cars from various brands instead of 5. 

14 January 2019
I really don't know who is meant to enjoy reading this?

There is nothing - nothing - interesting about yet more fiddling with existing platforms, dashboard etc.

If you change your socks, you do not become a different person.

And you will never be a 200 if you are a 1.3.

FM8

14 January 2019
eseaton wrote:

I really don't know who is meant to enjoy reading this? There is nothing - nothing - interesting about yet more fiddling with existing platforms, dashboard etc. If you change your socks, you do not become a different person. And you will never be a 200 if you are a 1.3.

I'm only trying hook FMS...

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