Updated C4 people-carriers get Spacetourer moniker for closer alignment with brand's nine-seater

Citroën's C4 MPV models have been updated and renamed for 2018, with sales now open and prices starting at £21,125.

That entry price is for the five-seater, which is now called the C4 Spacetourer (and pictured above and below). Its seven-seat sibling, the Grand C4 Spacetourer (pictured bottom), starts at £23,425.

A spokesman told Autocar that the updated pair ditch the Picasso name - which had adorned their predecessors since the C4 MPV was born in 2006 - to align more closely with Citroën's largest people-carrier, the nine-seat Spacetourer.

Along with the new names, the C4 MPVs, which are both built on the PSA Group's EMP2 platform, gain extra safety equipment, including a Safety Pack that adds driver attention alert, speed sign recognition and recommendation, as well as active safety brake technology.

The engine line-up will gain a BlueHDi 160 diesel unit with stop/start technology and will be paired with an eight-speed automatic gearbox. Pricing for cars with that powertrain will start from £27,550 when they arrive in showrooms on 1 June.

That option will overtake the BlueHDi 150 diesel, which comes with a six-speed manual or automatic with the same number of cogs, to be the new top diesel powerplant.

Buyers can also choose from three and four-cylinder turbocharged petrol engines offering up to 163bhp.

The C4 MPV models have bucked industry trends, with sales remaining strong, despite a downturn in demand in the segment. Citroën sold 99,254 C4 Picassos and Grand C4 Picassos in Europe last year, although that's 7013 fewer than in 2016.

The nine-seat Spacetourer, which was been in production since 2016, falls into a more niche segment and its sales reflect that. Citroën sold 8837 units in 2017, but demand for the model was highest at the end of the year, suggesting that figure could drastically improve in 2018.

While Citroën’s European sales have remained strong, the brand has been struggling in China, where its sales were down 47.3% in 2017 amid a slowing economy. Brand boss Linda Jackson told Autocar earlier this year that, excluding China, Citroën's sales rose by 7.5% in 2017.

Citroën’s smallest people-carrier, the Berlingo Multispace, was replaced with a new version that made its public debut at the Geneva motor show. The model, which is also built on the EMP2 platform, has inherited the brand’s latest design language.

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Our Verdict

Citroën C4 Picasso

It might not be as dynamically accomplished as some of its rivals, but there's still lots to like about the new C4 Picasso

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Comments
20

28 February 2018

Is this the same spokesman who told you Porsche is droping all diesel engines?

28 February 2018

Wonder if the real reason is they've lost the licence to use the Picasso name

28 February 2018

Wonder if the real reason is they've lost the licence to use the Picasso name

28 February 2018
superstevie wrote:

Wonder if the real reason is they've lost the licence to use the Picasso name

 

presumably. Why pay a large licensing fee to the Picasso estate for models in a niche segment that’s rapidly dying. 

28 February 2018
Bob Cat Brian wrote:

superstevie wrote:

Wonder if the real reason is they've lost the licence to use the Picasso name

 

presumably. Why pay a large licensing fee to the Picasso estate for models in a niche segment that’s rapidly dying. 

Other artists are available. I quite fancy a Grand C4 Hockney

 


28 February 2018

I think I'd give the C4 Tracy Emin a miss though.  The upholstery might be a bit icky...

28 February 2018

Never really understood the connection between a Spanish modernist artist and lardy Citroens anyway?

1 March 2018

I do wish companies would just tell the truth.  'Spacetourer' is a decent name for an MPV and there should be no shame in just calling it a rebranding to something that works well for what are good looking MPVs.  When they then try to make a case about aligning it with the larger model - a converted van - which sells in relatively tiny numbers, you know that they are protesting too much, and hence you start to wonder about whether they are covering for an alternative reason. 

So, it makes it very likely that @Superstevie has called it right, although I suspect that it's more about saving the cost of what they pay to the Picasso estate for the use of the name.

The car-buying public gets what it deserves, unfortunately ...

1 May 2018

I'd glad there's still a market for such vehicles. From a family point of view, these surely make more sense than an SUV, with their light and airy cabins and deeper windows

 

1 May 2018

Y don't they learn some lessons from the Germans...

#Dieselsforlife

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