New SUV will be a 'core model' in Mazda's range; it's due on sale in the UK this year
James Attwood, digital editor
5 September 2019

Mazda has announced UK pricing and specifications for its new CX-30 compact crossover

Sitting between the CX-3 and CX-5, the new model is priced from £22,895. It's available initially with a choice of two petrol engines and five trim levels. 

Entry-level SE-L comes equipped with 16in metallic alloy wheels, rear parking sensors, electrically adjustable wing mirrors, chrome exhaust tips and automatic wipers as standard. Inside, it receives a cloth interior, manually adjustable front seats, a head-up display and an electronic parking brake. 

SE-L Lux adds £1300 to the model’s list price, bringing front parking sensors, heated front seats, a rear-view camera and a powered tailgate. Sport Lux, from £25,295, includes 18in alloy wheels, a black front grille and adaptive LED headlights. 

GT Sport and GT Sport Tech head up the CX-30 range from £27,095, adding automatically tilting wing mirrors, a black leather interior, a heated steering wheel and a 360deg camera. 

Our Verdict

Mazda CX-30 2019 road test review - hero front

The 3-based Mazda CX-30 is the first SUV based on the Japanese brand’s latest hardware

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The CX-30 features Mazda’s distinctive Kodo design language and uses the firm’s latest-generation engines, including the Skyactiv-X compression ignition powertrain. The Japanese firm says the CX-30 is a global model "made at key global plants".

Two 2.0-litre petrol engines are available at launch: the 120bhp Skyactiv-G unit and the more potent 178bhp Skyactiv-X. Both can be mated to either a six-speed manual or six-speed automatic gearbox. 

Both petrol engines offered in the machine are mild-hybrid units, featuring a motor driven by a 24V battery. The CX-30 will also be offered with Mazda's Skyactiv-D diesel engine in the near future. All models feature all-wheel drive balanced by a central torque distribution system. 

Mazda says the SUV has been styled to reflect the "flowing beauty of a coupé and the bold toughness of an SUV". It features a bold, large, triangular grille similar to that seen on the 3, along with the traditional high-riding SUV stance, black body trim and a relatively sleek rear end. 

Built on the same Skyactiv platform as the 3, the CX-30 has been honed to offer dynamic handling, Mazda claims, despite the high-riding SUV form.

The CX-30 is 4395mm long, 1795mm wide and 1540mm tall and has a wheelbase of 2655mm, making it virtually identical in size to class rivals such as the Qashqai and Seat Ateca. It features a 430-litre boot, which matches the Qashqai. 

The interior has a driver-focused cockpit with a two-part 'wing' design and an 8.8in central infotainment screen angled towards the driver's seat. The system features what Mazda calls a "new, intuitive guidance system" and is compatible with Apple CarPlay and Android Auto. The driver display mixes analogue and digital displays. 

Read more

Mazda CX-30 review

Mazda 3 2.0 Skyactiv-G 2019 review

Mazda Skyactiv-X engine range to gain plug-in hybrid variant from 2021

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Comments
12

5 March 2019

Seeing this new CX-30 CUV, suddenly Mazda's brave decision relating to that C-pillar on the 3 Hatch makes sense.  The CX-30 is clearly aimed at the family buyer, leaving the 5 door version of the 3 to take on a quasi-coupe look.  Both are very fine looking things, with lots of individual style.  Note how the new smaller Alfa CUV concept has very similar surfacing to the Mazda and, if anything, the Mazda is the better looking, more balanced design.

5 March 2019

Why family would want that 'munter' impractical 3 hatchback over this is beyond me.  Mazda just got back on track IMHO.

Please, please come with a Turbo 1.5'ish option

5 September 2019
xxxx wrote:

Why family would want that 'munter' impractical 3 hatchback over this is beyond me.  Mazda just got back on track IMHO.

Please, please come with a Turbo 1.5'ish option

I actually like the 3, looked at one in the show room and found rear seat accommodation to be perfectly fine, though maybe less so for children.  This cx30 does make more sense as a family car and is also a great looking car, the cx3 really should be called cx2 as it is based on the 2 (I think) but all of them are great looking cars especially in this stunning metallic red.

 

On a side note, Autocar, please sort out advert and spam access to these comments sections as this thread has 6 full pages of rubbish, not comments by readers.

5 September 2019
si73 wrote:

xxxx wrote:

Why family would want that 'munter' impractical 3 hatchback over this is beyond me.  Mazda just got back on track IMHO.

Please, please come with a Turbo 1.5'ish option

I actually like the 3, looked at one in the show room and found rear seat accommodation to be perfectly fine, though maybe less so for children.  This cx30 does make more sense as a family car and is also a great looking car, the cx3 really should be called cx2 as it is based on the 2 (I think) but all of them are great looking cars especially in this stunning metallic red.

Not sure how you found it fine in the rear but children probably won't.  Anyway maybe Whatcar said it better of the rear accomadation:

This is an area of weakness for the Mazda 3. The best cars in the class, which include the Skoda Scala and Octavia, as well as the Ford Focus, allow six-footers space even if the front seats are slid well back. In the 3, anyone tall will find their knees are in close proximity to the front seat and head brushing the roof. It's tight for three adults across the rear bench, too.

Even if you’re smaller it's not great. The acutely upswept rear windows make it one of the more claustrophobic cars in this class, and even getting in and out through its comparatively small door apertures isn't as easy as it could be."

5 September 2019
xxxx wrote:

si73 wrote:

xxxx wrote:

Why family would want that 'munter' impractical 3 hatchback over this is beyond me.  Mazda just got back on track IMHO.

Please, please come with a Turbo 1.5'ish option

I actually like the 3, looked at one in the show room and found rear seat accommodation to be perfectly fine, though maybe less so for children.  This cx30 does make more sense as a family car and is also a great looking car, the cx3 really should be called cx2 as it is based on the 2 (I think) but all of them are great looking cars especially in this stunning metallic red.

Not sure how you found it fine in the rear but children probably won't.  Anyway maybe Whatcar said it better of the rear accomadation:

This is an area of weakness for the Mazda 3. The best cars in the class, which include the Skoda Scala and Octavia, as well as the Ford Focus, allow six-footers space even if the front seats are slid well back. In the 3, anyone tall will find their knees are in close proximity to the front seat and head brushing the roof. It's tight for three adults across the rear bench, too.

Even if you’re smaller it's not great. The acutely upswept rear windows make it one of the more claustrophobic cars in this class, and even getting in and out through its comparatively small door apertures isn't as easy as it could be."

I found it fine sat behind the driver's seat set for myself, I'm only 5'8 mind, and as for children may not find it ok, I was referring to the height of the window sill as it rises to the rear. As an adult I could see out fine but a smaller child may not and as such may find it claustrophobic. That was what I was alluding to.

5 March 2019

I was just about to say the same thing.  Mazda's bravery with the lack of rear passenger and boot space in the 3 now makes sense, the CX-30 provides a more family focussed option.I still think Mazda should bring the CX-9 to the UK; the large SUV market is still a popular and I'm sure profitable one here.Back to the CX-30; I really like the styling (I'm not a massive SUV fan, but they have their uses), the interior quality and design looks a good step forward on the previous 3, and the promise of mild hybrid and compression ignition engine would definitely be tempting. 

5 March 2019

CX-5 too big, CX-3 too small (way too small!  It's basically a SUV 2+2 with no boot space).

Now this may sound really weird coming from a time where SUV's are everywhere, but actually finding an SUV this size with a decent auto transmission is almost impossible. VW DSG unreliable, CVT is a joke, Korean's attempts inefficient. This could well be the answer to replace my manual Ateca because up until now, an auto X1 is the only thing that suits.

5 March 2019

The CX-3 should have been called the CX-2, given it's dimensions (particuarly inside).  I also think Mazda possibly limited themselve in what to call this; they probably wanted to call it the CX-4, but that already exists as a Chinese only market coupe CX-5.  This will definintely appeal to those who considered the CX-5 but found it too big.  The driving dynamics should be a step up on it's already impressive big brother.

21 March 2019

It's a little strange that your editors have slipped a picture of a CX-3 in along with the CX-30 pics.

 

Regardless, I am looking forward to seeing this car in person. As an owner of a 1990 miata and a 2004 Mazda 6 wagon, I have been waiting  for a suitable wagon replacement since the current Mazda6 wagon is not offered for sale in the US.

 

The new Mazda 3 is  beautiful in person but I can only fit my gold clubs in the trunk (boot) if I pull out my driver.  The cx5 has plenty of room but sits up a bit high and narrow for me. This new one looks just right, goldilocks. I'm an  empty nester, not really the target demographic, but this seems like a nice replacement for my current wagon.

21 August 2019

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