Big SUV is to get brand-first safety tech and a fresh new look for its fourth generation

The next Hyundai Santa Fe will get a drastically different design and new interior technology in order to give the fourth-generation model its best shot of fighting it out in the SUV segment's sharp end.

Ahead of its reveal at the Geneva motor show this March, the new car's exterior has been previewed with sketches. These show an aggressive front end with a split headlight design – similar to that of the smaller Kona – and a pinched rear with an angled tailgate.

Among the tech highlights are a rear occupant alert - a warning to let the driver know when leaving the car if there’s someone in the rear seats – as well as automatic emergency braking (AEB) added to the rear cross-traffic alert system, effectively giving the car AEB in both forward and reverse. 

The new Sante Fe has been part-developed at the Nürburgring, as Hyundai looks to sharpen the handling of its range by testing all of its models there, no matter how performance-focused they are.

The Santa Fe is the largest car that Hyundai sells in the UK, and is a rival to the Ford Edge, Skoda Kodiaq and Nissan X-Trail. Previous versions have been criticised for substandard interior quality, mixed ergonomics and high CO2 when equipped with the automatic gearbox. 

It's currently powered by a 2.2-litre CRDi engine, and this is likely to be updated for greater efficiency and fewer emissions for the new model. The higher-powered 2.0-litre CRDi engine from the Tucson may also be carried over to the next-generation car.

It's part of a far-reaching effort by Hyundai to make its models more stylish and better to drive. “It would be very nice if in 10 to 15 years we can have people on the street seeing Hyundai as a brand that makes cars that are fun to drive,” said Klaus Köster, Hyundai’s director of high-performance vehicles.

“We have already established ourselves as a reliable, quality car maker that makes cars with good designs,” he said. “But now we have the knowledge to add sportiness to that image – which is something us Europeans like.”

Hyundai is also expected to reveal an electric version of the Kona in Geneva.

Read more:

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Hyundai Santa Fé

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Comments
12

25 January 2018

A rear occupant alert? Really? This sounds like an April fool's story, and I'm particularly surprised its from Hyundai. You'd probably expect Land Rover to come up with something like this, just to remind you before you remotely fold down the rear seats from the supermarket check out..

30 January 2018
catnip wrote:

A rear occupant alert? Really? This sounds like an April fool's story, and I'm particularly surprised its from Hyundai. You'd probably expect Land Rover to come up with something like this, just to remind you before you remotely fold down the rear seats from the supermarket check out..

Actually this is smart thinking. In Australia, children die because they're accidentally left in cars. We're only human afterall.

30 January 2018
catnip wrote:

A rear occupant alert? Really? This sounds like an April fool's story, and I'm particularly surprised its from Hyundai. You'd probably expect Land Rover to come up with something like this, just to remind you before you remotely fold down the rear seats from the supermarket check out..

You've not heard of small children dying as a result of being forgotten in the back seat in a hot climate, have you? It happens with distressing frequency.

25 January 2018

Despite the ridiculousness of the rear seat occupancy sensor, when you think about it deeper it seems perfect for today's modern family who barely see each other as both parents are working, and when they do they don't communicate because they are all on their phones and tablets.

25 January 2018
oaffie wrote:

Despite the ridiculousness of the rear seat occupancy sensor, when you think about it deeper it seems perfect for today's modern family who barely see each other as both parents are working, and when they do they don't communicate because they are all on their phones and tablets.

But even if there are people there that aren't talking to you, surely you notice whether they're there or not? So much about the lastest vehicles suggests that drivers  don't need to be aware of their car's size, surroundings, etc. Still, i guess it allows drivers to concentrate on their central touch screens....

25 January 2018
A lot of people have not read the sad stories of babies and toddlers forgotten in the back seats under the hot sun by distracted parents.

31 January 2018
giulivo wrote:

A lot of people have not read the sad stories of babies and toddlers forgotten in the back seats under the hot sun by distracted parents.

I honestly hadn't and didn't realise it was a problem. Where do the parents think their kids are then?

30 January 2018

Both my cars have sensors which detect whether someones seating in the rear seats without the seat belt 'plugged in' already, a software update will cost pennies so this isn't could be implemented by March for free by all manufacturers is it's that important.   

typos1 - Just can’t respect opinion

30 January 2018

Join the Herd, why all of a sudden must we want an SUV.....?, what are the reasons given that an SUV is a better option these Days...?

Peter Cavellini.

30 January 2018

A guy was supposed to drop his kid in kidergarden on the way to the office. He was thinking about work, the kid was left from 09.00 till 16.30 and when he returned the kid was dead !!

Shit happens - good thinking and another first by Hyundai. This new model looks way better than the old tonka plastic box of previous generations. Its a tad expensive but you will get a wonderful warrenty and total reliability. My only concern will be economy - something they are not very good at achieving in the real world

what's life without imagination

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