Ten years after Elon Musk first announced his master plan for Tesla, the second phase has now been revealed. Take a look at exclusive Autocar renders of the new models, too

Tesla boss Elon Musk has unveiled his so-called ‘Master Plan, Part Deux’, which includes product plans for the firm’s car model line-up, further autonomous technology and intentions to enter the public transport sector.

Musk announced his first master plan a decade ago; since then, all of those proposals have come to fruition, including the Tesla Model S, Model X and Model 3, as well as becoming a provider of solar power.

Announcing the second part of his master plan on Tesla’s website last night, Musk confirmed there will be a compact SUV and pick-up truck in its vehicle line-up, while ruling out a cheaper vehicle than the Model 3.

He also identified two other electric vehicles he thinks are necessary - “heavy-duty trucks and high passenger-density urban transport” - both of which he confirmed are in the early stages of development at Tesla and will be unveiled next year. Referring to the heavy-duty truck as “Tesla Semi”, Musk said: “We believe [it] will deliver a substantial reduction in the cost of cargo transport, while increasing safety and making it really fun to operate.”

Increasing autonomy

Musk said that as technology matures, all Tesla vehicles will be fully self-driving, but with “fail-operational capability, meaning that any given system in the car could break and the car will still drive itself safely”.

However, he added that even when the software is highly refined and far better than the average human driver, there will be a significant time gap before fully autonomous driving is approved by regulators.

Musk also alluded to the recent death of a driver while using Tesla’s Autopilot, explaining that if used correctly, partial autonomy is “already significantly safer than a person driving by themselves”. He continued that it would therefore be “morally reprehensible to delay release simply for fear of bad press or some mercantile calculation of legal liability”.

Autopilot is still in a beta phase, Musk said, and will continue to improve. Once Autopilot is roughly 10 times safer than the US vehicle average, the beta label will be removed, he added.

Solar-powered roofs

Last month Tesla announced its intention to buy solar energy company Solarcity in order to integrate its technology into Musk's vision for the future of energy consumption, whereby households generate and store their own renewable energy - stored in Tesla's Powerwall batteries and used in Tesla's range of vehicles. 

Musk has now confirmed that he wants to create a “smoothly integrated and beautiful” solar roof and battery product for homes, which can be scaled worldwide, describing the buying process as “one ordering experience, one installation, one service contact, one phone app”.

Car sharing

Musk also plans to introduce a car sharing platform, allowing a fully autonomous Tesla car to “generate income for you while you’re at work or on vacation”, explaining that once self-driving is approved by regulators, a Tesla vehicle will be able to be summoned from anywhere. He commented: “Since most cars are only in use by their owner for 5% to 10% of the day, the fundamental economic utility of a true self-driving car is likely to be several times that of a car which is not.”

Tesla will also run its own fleet in cities where demand exceeds supply of customer-owned cars.

Musk also talked about Tesla’s production facility, describing how the brand’s engineering has transitioned to focus heavily on designing the “machine that makes the machine”, meaning that the factory itself becomes a product. He added that the first Model 3 production line should be thought of as "version 0.5, with version 1.0 probably [due] in 2018”. This philosophy will help the brand to scale up production volume as quickly as possible, according to Musk.

Read Autocar's Tesla Model X review 

Blog: Tesla's second masterplan is ambitious, but all the more exciting for it

Our Verdict

Tesla Model X

The electric propulsion pioneer takes aim at the seven-seat SUV market

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Comments
12

21 July 2016
When will he actually make a profit ??

Lanman

21 July 2016
ralphsmall wrote:

When will he actually make a profit ??

Probably when they're not developing a 250% increase in product lines, 900%+ increase in volume and the world's widest building, along with establishing the supercharger network, stores and service centres.

The cars make a good gross profit, so if production is proportionate to the overheads, the company would be profitable. Barring some unexpected catastrophe that's bound to happen, probably after a year of Model 3 deliveries. In the meantime the company has a $2b+ line of credit to work with.

21 July 2016
And all the traditional bases are covered. But a well resolved reasonably priced electric delivery wan certainly could be in sufficient demand to warrant production.

21 July 2016
I'll have a Lada Riva Jeep. (instead).

www.KOOOLcr.com

 

21 July 2016
You've got to take your hat of to Musk, some of these ideas, especially the car sharing program really have to potential to be a proper game changer.
One thing I'd love to see is someone focusing on electric motorcycles - the noise pollution they generate is a big issue in cities, and will become more noticeable as cars electrify.

21 July 2016
I refer you to the Johammer J1. You're most welcome.

www.johammer.com/en/electric-motorcycle/

21 July 2016
Or a 'bus' as I call it. But joking aside, I admire Musk enormously, not least for not caving in to legal & media pressure over self-driving accidents. If all of our industrialists were like him we'd be making such massive strides in technology, rather than timid, safe, tentative baby steps.

22 July 2016
I suppose if it made it financially viable you might, but I wouldn't really want my car getting up to mischief and returning scratched or dirtied, full of vomit or who knows what. Autonomous cars will certainly offer many new and unthought of possibilities. But I reckon most people will still want their own car, parked in their own garage, full of their own junk, ready to go anywhere 24/7 when they want to go there. You can't take your kids to A+E when they fall over and your car's out earning money. But thank heavens the world still has some visionaries like Musk.

22 July 2016
androo wrote:

I suppose if it made it financially viable you might, but I wouldn't really want my car getting up to mischief and returning scratched or dirtied, full of vomit or who knows what. Autonomous cars will certainly offer many new and unthought of possibilities. But I reckon most people will still want their own car, parked in their own garage, full of their own junk, ready to go anywhere 24/7 when they want to go there. You can't take your kids to A+E when they fall over and your car's out earning money. But thank heavens the world still has some visionaries like Musk.

As the former owner of a private hire business I can tell you that it is difficult enough to prevent a car becoming a pit of ordure with a human driver in place, so autonomous cars would be entirely at the mercy of the worst of drunken and loutish behaviour, and highly unpleasant for the next user or on return to the owner. As to driving your kids to A&E when necessary, the whole purpose of autonomous cars, in the eyes of the lefties who dreamt them up, is that the car wouldn't take you to A&E, or anywhere else, until you had the proper clearance from officialdom to make a journey, at a permitted time to a permitted destination.

I don't need to put my name here, it's on the left

 

25 July 2016
bowsersheepdog wrote:
androo wrote:

I suppose if it made it financially viable you might, but I wouldn't really want my car getting up to mischief and returning scratched or dirtied, full of vomit or who knows what. Autonomous cars will certainly offer many new and unthought of possibilities. But I reckon most people will still want their own car, parked in their own garage, full of their own junk, ready to go anywhere 24/7 when they want to go there. You can't take your kids to A+E when they fall over and your car's out earning money. But thank heavens the world still has some visionaries like Musk.

As the former owner of a private hire business I can tell you that it is difficult enough to prevent a car becoming a pit of ordure with a human driver in place, so autonomous cars would be entirely at the mercy of the worst of drunken and loutish behaviour, and highly unpleasant for the next user or on return to the owner. As to driving your kids to A&E when necessary, the whole purpose of autonomous cars, in the eyes of the lefties who dreamt them up, is that the car wouldn't take you to A&E, or anywhere else, until you had the proper clearance from officialdom to make a journey, at a permitted time to a permitted destination.

Autonomous cars are likely to surf well ahead of legislation, they are hardly the creation of government to suppress the population. More likely they will provide mobility to set far more the population free from relying on others and on public transport.

The issue of people treating them bad is pretty obvious, if the next user doesn't like the condition of the car they simply report it. The car heads to the cleaning centre on it's own and the previous occupant gets the bill on their card.

As for using it to get to A&E, more likely that the way to the A&E department traffic will be cleared from in front of you and if it is quicker to rendezvous with an Ambulance on the way that will be easy to arrange.

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