Ferrari's Special Projects division creates one-off F12, Mark Fields favourite to take over from Mulally, Peugeot selling innovative compressed air tech, GM invests in battery factory

Ferrari's Special Projects division has reportedly created a new one-off Targa version of the F12 Berlinetta. Although still disguised, the model has been modified with three new bonnet vents and a restyled front bumper. Reports suggest the car could be named SP America.

The announcement of Ford COO Mark Fields as the successor to current boss Alan Mulally is understood to be imminent. Mulally is expected to retire from his post at the end of this year, having headed Ford since 2006.

Peugeot is trying to sell its HybridAir technology to competitors. Company boss Maxime Picat said the firm needs "at least 500,000" units to be sold every year in order to make the system viable. The move means other car makers outside of PSA could adopt the technology.

General Motors is to invest £267 million across two of its facilities responsible for producing its battery-powered vehicles. Of that sum, £228 million will go to its Detroit assembly plant and £38m to its battery plant. The facilities currently manufacture the Chevrolet Volt, Vauxhall Ampera and Cadillac ELR. This investment suggests GM is readying replacements for those models.

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Ferrari F12 Berlinetta

Can Maranello evoke past greats with its latest front-engined V12, or do rivals from Aston Martin, Porsche and Lamborghini have a more complete take on the supercar formula?

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Additional reporting by Mike Vousden

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Comments
5

23 April 2014
Mark Fields was announced a couple of days ago as Alan Mulally's successor at Ford.

Keep up Autocar - the internet world is leaving you behind

23 April 2014
As it has been designed by Ferrari's Special Projects Division, do you think this one will actually be nice to look at?

24 April 2014
Could they make it worse?

24 April 2014
If Hybrid Air was as promising as it sounds, I don't think PSA would be selling it to competitors. If it worked, I can't help thinking that every Citroen should incorporate it as part of the company's brand value - rather like Citroen's of old had hydropneumatic suspension.
It sounds like all those claims made for the system were false after all.

24 April 2014
LP in Brighton wrote:

If Hybrid Air was as promising as it sounds, I don't think PSA would be selling it to competitors. If it worked, I can't help thinking that every Citroen should incorporate it as part of the company's brand value - rather like Citroen's of old had hydropneumatic suspension.
It sounds like all those claims made for the system were false after all.

Not really, the car business is very expensive and to incorporate new tech its takes a lot of investment with all the engine/gearbox cals, crash tests, certifications, packaging etc etc its extremely expensive let alone with low volume numbers the suppliers would be charging you a high cost which then would have to be priced into the car and passed onto the customer. To incorporate it onto one car alone you would be talking at least £15-20million. Suppliers will quite happily charge a fortune if the numbers are too low. If they can sell the tech to get the volume numbers respectable the costs shouldn't then make it to the customer.(well they'll always charge more for an eco box but you hopefully get my point) This tech along with flywheels/freewheels have been around for a while but far too expensive to roll out into the current market.

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Our Verdict

Ferrari F12 Berlinetta

Can Maranello evoke past greats with its latest front-engined V12, or do rivals from Aston Martin, Porsche and Lamborghini have a more complete take on the supercar formula?

Find an Autocar car review

Driven this week