Currently reading: Dacia leads European car market growth in 2013
Data for the first 11 months of 2013 shows strong demand for new cars, Dacia leads the pack with volume growth while other manufacturers suffer from poor sales
Darren Moss
News
2 mins read
18 December 2013

Dacia is one of the fastest growing car brands in Europe so far in 2013.

That's according to new data showing how many cars have been sold in the first 11 months of 2013 in the EU. The report shows that Dacia has sold over 20 per cent more cars in 2013 than it did in the same period last year. 

At the same time, the brand has increased its market share from 1.9 per cent in 2012, to 2.4 per cent in 2013. The report shows that the demand for new cars in Europe has increased for the third month in a row, despite overall volumes being down on the same period in 2012.

Among the brands which have found their volumes contracting is Alfa Romeo, whose sales of 57,964 cars so far in 2013 - versus 81,879 units in the same period last year - means it has shrunk in terms of volume by 29.2 per cent in the EU. 

Lancia/Chrysler and Chevrolet have also seen their volumes shrink this year, alongside PSA whose volumes are down by almost ten per cent in the EU.

Seat, Mercedes-Benz and Mazda, meanwhile, have all seen sales rise in the first eleven months of the year. Jaguar Land Rover's overall sales have risen by 9.9 per cent, while individual rises for the Jaguar brand are up by 15.6 per cent.

The Volkswagen Group remains at the top of the leaderboard, selling 2.73 million units so far this year. That's compared to 2.79 million cars sold in the previous year, meaning the group's volumes have contracted by 2.1 per cent overall. Volkswagen's individual volumes are down by over five per cent.

In total, 10.9 million cars have been sold in the EU in the first eleven months of the year, a decrease of 2.7 per cent over the 11.2 million vehicles registered in the same period in 2012. In the UK, the car market has risen by almost ten per cent, with 2.1 million new car registrations so far in 2013 versus 1.9 million vehicles registered last year.

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jonboy4969 18 December 2013

@289, shut up, yes there are

@289, shut up, yes there are some pre reg stuff about but if you think it is 30% then you really should go out and see what really is going on in the UK motor industry, if you think that 30% of 2 million cars, (600,000) are left sitting on the forecourts this year and every year by your reckoning, then there must be millions just sitting there.

I think you really should not bother posting if you cant post real facts.

fadyady 18 December 2013

With 4 models in the top sellers

Volkswagen easily dominates car sales charts in Europe.
hedgecreep 18 December 2013

More likely it is because the

More likely it is because the alternatives both new and second-hand have become so weighed down with superfluous gadgetry and by their cost that any cut price honesty in the market is a breath of fresh air. I mean, the Dacia is positively glowing with old fashioned simplicity and value.

When you look at the headlines here today - Audi launching a billion more models, which we all know will be parked outside the Taylor Wimpey homes of overambitious underachievers - the Dacia becomes even more appealing. It is the antithesis of today's flashy lease car mentality, and I hope more manufacturers introduce models with manual window winders soon!

bomb 18 December 2013

hedgecreep wrote: I hope

hedgecreep wrote:

I hope more manufacturers introduce models with manual window winders soon!

Why? Even the £900 Ford Ka I used to drive had power windows and was quite well equipped. I don't understand this desire for a hair shirt driving experience, it's inverse snobbery if you ask me. As bad as those lease drivers you admonish.

hedgecreep 18 December 2013

One less thing to go wrong?

Quote:

Why?

One less thing to go wrong? Cars have become too complex and even the smallest electrical fault has become expensive to fix out of warranty. A hankering for the old days when cars weren't all about safety, regulations and emissions? A realisation that not every single aspect of our lives must be motorised to be useful? You are looking too hard for answers and grasping at psychological straws. Most owners are not going to have half an acre of gravel drive, you have the internet to thank for amplifying such silly anecdotal nonsense. But you know, given that your DS3 has been squeezed from the style-before-substance sausage machine I'm not surprised you felt a little prickled by my deliberately rabble rousing comments. Don't think I see you in a Dacia!

bomb 18 December 2013

hedgecreep][quote wrote: But

hedgecreep][quote wrote:

But you know, given that your DS3 has been squeezed from the style-before-substance sausage machine I'm not surprised you felt a little prickled by my deliberately rabble rousing comments. Don't think I see you in a Dacia!

He he, quite right. You won't see me near a Dacia. My DS3 is a humble little C3 with not as much as you think changed on it, does pretty much everything any other 3-dr hatch can but puts a big smile on your face. No big smiles in the dreary Dacia, ever. Needlessly austere.

My old shed of a Ka was a rattly old bucket but it could also put a smile on your face, you didn't have to be the least bit precious about it. That style of motoring also has great appeal.

Not quite sure where the gravel drive comes into this, I think you've been on the wrong websites, but why be so pessimistic in your choice of wheels? The world is pessimistic enough, I think some mistakenly believe the Dacia is the essence of motoring. It's just an old Renault.

hedgecreep 18 December 2013

bomb wrote:Not quite sure

bomb wrote:

Not quite sure where the gravel drive comes into this, I think you've been on the wrong websites, but why be so pessimistic in your choice of wheels? The world is pessimistic enough, I think some mistakenly believe the Dacia is the essence of motoring. It's just an old Renault.

If you're not sure where gravel entered the discussion you've clearly been cherry picking messages! Re-read thread please. I don't think Dacia has captured some mystical essence of motoring, and I'm not sure its buyers are mistaken about any aspect of their purchase. The average age of a Dacia owner is over 50, so it won't be their first car, they'll know all the essentials, and they won't be constrained by aspects such as insurance or a need to show off to neighbours. What they will be constrained by as they head towards retirement is a feeling that any savings and other retirement provisions are losing value rather than gaining it, and that spending money on high visibility trinkets is best avoided (a point made more obvious by BMWs and Benzes accounting for almost all the UK's top ten most stolen cars). You can be certain that like myself the overwhelming majority of Dacia drivers grew up without electric windows, and as the purchasing power of the middle classes drops like a TV set from a hotel balcony and sense takes hold once again, optional extras will take a back rather than front seat in any car purchase. We might even start to lower our world beating levels of personal debt rather than raising them year upon year through PCP agreements and such like. And as any married man will attest, cheap steel wheels forever! Well, they're cheaper than parking sensors, aren't they?