Currently reading: Throwback Thursday - Giugiaro’s vision of a 1990s Jaguar, 15 August 1990
In 1990, Giugiaro unveiled its vision of how a modern Jaguar saloon would look - complete with self-opening doors and self-starting engine
Matt Burt
News
3 mins read
13 August 2015

Behold the Kensington, an early 1990s interpretation from the pen of the great Giorgetto Giugiaro of how future Jaguar saloons should look.

The car appeared as a styling model at the 1990 Geneva motor show and was later turned into a swooping prototype based on the chassis and mechanicals of the Jaguar XJ12 Sovereign HE.

Peter Robinson, at the time Autocar’s European editor, had the opportunity to drive the Kensington but was taken more with its technology than with its on-road manners or looks.

“Forget the controversial styling for one moment and consider Giugiaro’s Kensington Jaguar as perhaps the greatest automotive party trick of all time,” he wrote.

“You walk up to it holding a small device barely the size of a cigarette packet. On it are six small buttons. Stand 15ft away, point the control box at the car, press the appropriate button and there’s a mild clunk as the doors unlock.

“Nothing unusual in that – except this time it’s followed by a whirr and a click as the driver’s door begins to open. Believe me, it’s an eerie sensation, watching a car door extend out from the body, unaided by human hands.

“What happens next is even more bizarre. Squeeze another of the buttons and almost simultaneously the starter motor whirrs, as the Jaguar V12 engine fires up before quickly settling down to a smooth idle.

“You stare, not believing what you know to be true. The door is open, the engine running and your eyes tell you there’s nobody in the driver’s seat.

“No, it’s not done by trickery, just modern electronics. And both features can be expected to reach production cars during the coming decade.”

Driving the Kensington was broadly similar to driving contemporary V12-engined Jaguars, but the styling was a radical departure.

“What you’re most aware of with the Kensington is the startling change in interior ambience. In his quest to build a contemporary Jaguar, Giugiaro has forsaken the traditional timber interior.

“The sweeping, moulded plastic dashboard is massive, running off to the base of the windscreen and down a very wide, bulky console which contains a battery of LCD controls.

“The front quarter-light window is almost as wide at its base as the door’s opening window. In fact, the A-pillars are so long and steeply angled that you sit well back from the base of the windscreen. You see little of the bonnet, while rear visibility is also poor.”

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JIMBOB 13 August 2015

Nearly there...

Replace the dreary front end with an XJ220 style grille/headlight arrangement, put in some better rear light clusters and the 1990's might have been very different.
Daniel Joseph 13 August 2015

Not the best...

Definitely not one of Giugiaro's better efforts. The profile was ok (and rather better than Jaguar's own droopy S-type!) but the front and rear ends were pretty poor. The front looked a bit like the original Volvo S70 and V70 (i.e. the facelifted 850). The rear end had ugly angular light units, meant to reference the Series 3 Jaguar XJ, but instead they just made the tail look ridiculously narrow. Yes, it was used as the basis for the Daewoo Leganza, and was claimed by some to have influenced the look of the Lexus GS.
sirwiggum 13 August 2015

Daniel Joseph wrote:

Daniel Joseph wrote:

Definitely not one of Giugiaro's better efforts. The profile was ok (and rather better than Jaguar's own droopy S-type!) but the front and rear ends were pretty poor. The front looked a bit like the original Volvo S70 and V70 (i.e. the facelifted 850). The rear end had ugly angular light units, meant to reference the Series 3 Jaguar XJ, but instead they just made the tail look ridiculously narrow. Yes, it was used as the basis for the Daewoo Leganza, and was claimed by some to have influenced the look of the Lexus GS.

The mk2 Seat Toledo also has a nod to this, albeit in a shorter form.

If the reviewer didn't like not seeing the end of the bonnet, they'd hate driving a Xantia!

typos1 13 August 2015

Talking of Italian Jaguar

Talking of Italian Jaguar concepts, remember the Bertone B99 ? Deffo how modern Jags should look.
bowsersheepdog 15 August 2015

typos1 wrote: Talking of

typos1 wrote:

Talking of Italian Jaguar concepts, remember the Bertone B99 ? Deffo how modern Jags should look.

The B99 would certainly sell in America. It reminds me of last year's Dodge Charger, it's a very American look. The Kensington has a whiff of XJ220 saloon about it - it's the shape and angle of the side windows.