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Volkswagen's has high aspirations for its new crossover be the best in class and then some. We've driven the 1.0 TSI T-Roc out in the UK to see if it's as good as Wolfsburg says

Our Verdict

Volkswagen T-Roc

Volkswagen arrives late at the crossover hatchback party. But can the T-Roc still turn heads in a congested segment?

Sam Sheehan
14 December 2017

What is it?

Volkswagen is so confident in its new T-Roc that it doesn’t just expect to challenge for class honours; it reckons the crossover could be one of Britain’s best-selling vehicles.

The Volkswagen T-Roc 1.0 TSI SE you see here is predicted to be in heaviest demand, and for good reason; this is a brand with an enviable reach and dealer network, so flogging a mid-spec crossover - the nation’s best-selling type of car - should be easy.

However, the T-Roc will still have its work cut out. It faces a very strong list of rivals, including cars from its own stable, the Skoda Karoq and Seat Ateca, which, on paper at least, look like better propositions, because although they share the Volkswagen Group’s MQB underpinnings and a whole host of parts, the Czech and Spanish models are slightly larger and cheaper to buy.

To set the T-Roc apart, Volkswagen has given it a more premium, funky design while also engineering it to have a youthful character. Chassis development boss Karsten Schebsdat, the man who signed off the playful settings of the Golf GTI Clubsport and encouraged a more adjustable Polo GTI, believes higher-end versions of the T-Roc are the “most agile” in their class.

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For today’s test, we want to find out if that statement stands true for the UK’s predicted volume-seller, which is fitted with a turbocharged 1.0-litre three-cylinder that produces a modest 113bhp and 148lb ft. Will crossover buyers be tempted by the T-Roc's trendy image, or will they be unable to ignore the value for money offered elsewhere?

What's it like?

Compared to the rest of Volkswagen’s range, the T-Roc’s exterior styling is rather distinctive. It features quirky additions such as indicator lights that circle the fog light clusters and more boxy dimensions, along with a gently swooping roofline and angular lines.

You might expect this theme to carry across to the inside, but unless you opt for the more vibrant Design trim level, the interior's finish is comparably conservative – brushed aluminium-effect trim is about as exciting as it gets and the plastics feel tough rather than premium. That said, the dashboard design is tidy and contains an 8.0in infotainment touchscreen with key features such as Apple CarPlay and Android Auto smartphone mirroring. There’s no sat-nav in the SE, however. As standard, there's also no digital Active Information Display in place of the dials, although our test car (pictured) had this option added.

It’s easy to get comfortable in the T-Roc, thanks to a driver's seat that offers a wide range of adjustments and a steering wheel that can be pulled close. This leaves the T-Roc feeling only slightly taller than the Golf, but its 81mm-higher roofline ensures improved head room and better visibility.

On the move, the 1.0 TSI engine provides punchy mid-range grunt and a vigorous three-cylinder tone that, while being low in volume, gives off the aura of a lukewarm hatchback powerplant. Mated to a slick six-speed manual gearbox, it makes the T-Roc, even in this base petrol form, feel somewhat sporty.

Chassis guru Schebsdat hasn’t fallen short on his promise for a good handling car - the T-Roc rides and steers in the manner of a large hatchback rather than SUV. The front wheels are quick to respond to steering inputs and the damping is effective at eliminating wobbles or excessive body movement. Yet the car still has a supple ride on its 17in wheels, meaning you can make good progress along a B-road without fear of unsettling it.

There is, however, quite a lot of road noise on coarse surfaces, and the large wing mirrors can generate a fair amount of wind noise at motorway pace. But at no point does it become annoying or overly intrusive and, from the inside, the T-Roc feels rather Golf-like, which is a compliment.

For those in the back, there’s good enough leg room, but squeezing three adults on the back bench (which folds with a 60/40 split) will be a challenge. The middle seat is elevated by a few centimetres due to the transmission tunnel beneath - a compromise of the highly flexible MQB underpinnings – so head room there will be tight for anyone over 5ft 10in. Rear passengers are provided with a separate 12V power supply and two cupholders if they lower a section of the middle seat.

The car’s boot features a spare wheel beneath the floor. Its fitment removes a large amount of storage space, but it does at least mean the boot floor is flat to the lip, making loading and unloading heavy items significantly easier. Rear passengers can also reach into the boot through a ski hatch in the middle seat. These features ensure the T-Roc is more versatile than the Golf.

Should I buy one?

The T-Roc lacks answers for the class’s best when it comes to space, but the interior, while not the most original, is well put together and undeniably functional, and the whole car drives and rides like a quality product.

More importantly, even in low powered 1.0-litre guise, the T-Roc has a peppy and energetic character, flaunting on-road agility to worry lower-riding hatchbacks. And if we’re to see many more compact SUVs on the road, they might as well be ones that respond well to being driven enthusiastically.

Volkswagen T-Roc 1.0 TSI SE

Where Oxfordshire, UK On sale Now Price £20,425 Engine 3cyls, 999cc, turbocharged petrol Power 113bhp at 5000rpm Torque 148lb ft at 2000-3500rpm Gearbox 6-spd manual Kerb weight 1270kg Top speed 116mph 0-62mph 10.1sec Fuel economy 55.4mpg CO2 117g/km Rivals Seat Ateca, Skoda Kodiaq, Mini Countryman

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Comments
22

14 December 2017

No mention of the fact this car contains more hard plastics than a Dacia Duster...

14 December 2017
Shane_2005 wrote:

No mention of the fact this car contains more hard plastics than a Dacia Duster...

The plastics feel tough rather than premium - I think this is Autocars way of saying that, however they have  to flower it up for a VAG car. Other manufacturers the word ‘cheap’ would simply be used instead. Having sat in the rear of a Tiguan that was certainly very cheap feeling 

14 December 2017

How much more?

typos1 - Just can’t respect opinion

14 December 2017
xxxx wrote:

How much more?

 

£10,930 worth on this car tested. 

14 December 2017

...about the hard plastic inside is perhaps the best compromise to satisfy the main sponsor.

Anyway, the T-Roc seems reasonably performant (better Vmax or sprint that a more powerful Kia Stonic or Hyundai Kona) even if it is heavier.

-- Old fart with petrol in veins, so off the e-cars grid literally --

14 December 2017

Is the Audi Q2. The grille is different, granted, but otherwise quite similar.

14 December 2017

My only reservation regarding this car, is the slope on the rear of the car, drastically reducing it's boot capacity. I carry a wheelchair and sometimes two, so I'll probably go for yet another Touran.  

14 December 2017

My only reservation regarding this car, is the slope on the rear of the car, drastically reducing it's boot capacity. I carry a wheelchair and sometimes two, so I'll probably go for yet another Touran.  

14 December 2017

My choice would be top spec Design with the 150hp 4 cylinder 1.5 at £22,900. Pretty quick and doesn’t ruin the bank balance.

typos1 - Just can’t respect opinion

14 December 2017

Design is 2nd from top, I didn't scroll down. The comment below about the Automatic price is enlightening, surley a VW marketing mistake!

typos1 - Just can’t respect opinion

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