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Price, fuel economy, range and depreciation

There’s a broad spread of prices among PHEV estates. At the top end, performance specials such as the Peugeot 508 SW PSE and Volvo V60 Polestar Engineered are closing in on £60,000. At the other, the pragmatic Skoda Octavia iV Estate slips in at less than £35,000.

In Elegance trim, the Arteon Shooting Brake sits somewhere in the middle, costing £41,330, with optional extras such as the nappa leather upholstery upgrade, panoramic roof and ‘IQ Light’ headlights then taking our test car to £46,820. For something so large and comfortable, with two power sources, and not without some sense of occasion, those figures don’t strike us as being unreasonable.

Arteon Shooting Brake generally does better than rivals from mid-tier brands like the Peugeot 508 SW, but can’t match the BMW 3 Series Touring for residuals

However, what makes life difficult for the VW is the existence of the 330e M Sport Touring, which starts at around £43,000, feels more luxurious within, is comfortably quicker and is natively rear driven, with its longitudinally mounted four-cylinder engine. And we’d take fine handling and the extra performance over an extra 10% boot capacity any day.

As with any current mid-sized PHEV, the Arteon’s electric driving range is meagre, at around 25 miles in the real world. Neither is the economy potential of the 1.4-litre engine especially great, so unless you’re able to charge the battery frequently (or the car’s 14% benefit in kind is advantageous to you), consider first a straight petrol or diesel version.

The latter would be particularly well suited to long-distance duties, with the 66-litre fuel tank giving the car a touring range of around 900 miles.

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What Car? New car buyer marketplace - Volkswagen Arteon Shooting Brake