Since the 2000 Skoda revolution, value for money has been at the heart of the brand’s revitalisation. But more recently, starting with the Roomster, Skoda has indicated a desire to move its pricing closer to the established competition. A keen eye is therefore turned upon the Fabia’s equipment tally. Even the most basic S-spec Fabia offers front and side airbags, a height-adjustable driver’s seat, central locking, electric front windows and radio/CD with an aux socket – a tremendous amount of stuff for the money.

The Fabia SE spec of our test car adds useful functions like air-con, halogen lights with directional adjustment, 15in alloys, four more speakers and an alarm. That said, the current Fabia is no longer the bargain the model once was. Fuel economy should fall in line with, or marginally above, the class median, with a realistic average of 32.4mpg.

If the previous Fabia is anything to go by, residuals should be among the best in class

Our experience suggests the Fabia Greenline presents too great a compromise as an everyday prospect in chasing ever-greater mpg figures. At £13,875, it is more expensive than the cheapest 104bhp 1.6 TDI. This larger engine still emits only 109g/km, and is far easier to live with day-to-day.

Finally, if the previous Fabia is anything to go by, residuals should be among the best in class.

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