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Engine options, speed, acceleration and refinement

This Enyaq’s 201bhp might sound like a healthy output for a family car with no particular sporting intentions, but a two-tonne kerb weight dulls performance enough to make it feel a little ordinary under a full-throttle launch. It hits 60mph in 8.3sec, though, which is respectable. As with most EVs, top speed is electronically capped, here to 100mph.

In everyday motoring, the Enyaq often feels quicker than its 0-60mph time suggests. With little noise, no gears to shift and a subtle and fast-acting traction control system, the car feels plentifully swift in roll-on acceleration from town speeds. If you make full use of its torque out of junctions, the motor will chirp those 255-section rear tyres, detracting a little from the car’s effortless, assured temperament – if only for an instant.

The ‘engine start’ button is largely redundant as the car senses someone in the driver’s seat and will move off when put in D. Annoyingly, leaning over to get something from the passenger footwell can turn the car off (not once moving, of course).

The Enyaq is far from the only mid-sized EV on the market, of course, so if it’s acceleration you want, there are plenty of options that will deliver more of it. Like-for-like versions of the Ford Mustang Mach-E and Tesla Model 3 are both considerably quicker, as is a Kia e-Niro. But while the Skoda clearly isn’t a car that’s seeking to attract keener drivers, it certainly doesn’t feel slow.

Battery regeneration can be controlled using the paddles behind the steering wheel, although the Enyaq is a bit of a control freak in this respect. There are three levels of regen to choose from, but touch the accelerator and it will switch back to its automatic mode.

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If you want the strongest regen mode all the time, you can shift into ‘B’ on the gear selector, but for anything in between, you have to juggle the setting continually using the shift paddles. In fairness, the adaptive mode does a good job, but the excessive interference is frustrating.