We’ll cut to the chase here. Kia’s WLTP range and efficiency lab testing suggests an urban range for the e-Niro of 382 miles, and a combined one of 282 miles.

Our testing results are a touch less generous, suggesting that 230 miles is the car’s absolute range limit at a UK motorway-typical 70mph (what we call our touring test), rising to 294 miles if you slow to 50mph and drive in a fairly economical style, as you might on A- and B-roads. Those figures aren’t quite the equal of the Hyundai Kona Electric, but they’re still very commendable for an EV of this, or indeed any, price.

CAP expects e-Niro residuals to be slightly poorer than for Kona Electric, but better than for Nissan Leaf

Charging a 64kWh battery, meanwhile, clearly isn’t the work of a moment – but with a typical domestic UK wallbox charger, it can be achieved at home (for those with a driveway on which to park) to 80% full in less than 10 hours. On a 100kW DC rapid charger, via the car’s CCS Combo connection, the same is possible in less than an hour.

The e-Niro is available in only one model grade for now. The First Edition gets halogen headlights, 17in alloy wheels, heated leather seats and adaptive cruise control as standard; costs £36,495 before the £3500 money-off incentive currently available from the UK government; and qualifies for free VED road tax and 16% benefit-in-kind tax.

What Car? New car buyer marketplace - Kia e-Niro

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