From £23,845
Entry-level engine option means Audi TT 1.8 TFSI Sport adds value to the hard-top TT range

Our Verdict

Audi TT

The Audi TT remains a design icon, and is now a car that’s genuinely fun to drive no matter what engine or trim you choose

  • First Drive

    Audi TT S coupe first drive review

    In most powerful S form the third-generation Audi TT possesses real dynamic capability – and plenty of appeal as a classy premium coupé
  • First Drive

    Audi TT 1.8 TFSI Sport

    Entry-level engine option means Audi TT 1.8 TFSI Sport adds value to the hard-top TT range
13 February 2012

What is it?

This is the Audi TT coupé, as furnished recently with a 1.8-litre TFSI engine. The 1.8-litre engine has been available in the entry-level TT convertible for some time, but it’s only recently that the same powerplant has been offered in the hard-top coupé.

Significantly, in base Sport trim, and with a six-speed manual gearbox as tested here, it prices the second-generation TT under £25,000.

What’s it like?

Surprisingly decent. It might not be the most scintillating of coupés to drive but there’s no denying the Audi TT’s aesthetic appeal.

However, it’s been hamstrung by a bottom-rung price point that’s put it out of the reach of many who aspire to its premium-quality, if somewhat homogenised, good looks. This version aims squarely to address that.

With a 1240kg kerb weight the TT is just about light enough not to feel short-changed by the 1.8-litre motor. It’s smooth, torquey and responsive enough for everyday motoring, with just enough power to deliver a degree of excitement appropriate to the coupé’s broadly capable if slightly sterile chassis. It even makes all the right noises if you press the pedal hard enough.

Should I buy one?

Maybe. To be fair, this combination of car and engine makes a surprisingly convincing case for itself.

The 1.8-engined TT is a full £3000 less than an otherwise similarly specced 2.0-litre version, and as such presents a considerably more affordable way of buying into the TT’s style-led cachet

It comes with the added bonus of cheaper running costs, too. A combined 44.1mpg and 149g/km drop the 1.8 down into VED band F, compared with band G for the 42.8mpg, 152g/km 2.0-litre TT.

Of course, the larger-engined car delivers 0-62mph in 6.1sec to the 1.8’s 7.2sec, but the reality is that in day to day driving up to seven tenths or so you just rev the smaller engine 10 per cent harder to extract, up to a point, the same performance as the 2.0 offers.

All that said, for £2000 less you could buy an equally powerful and better to drive 1.4 TSI Volkswagen Scirocco.

Audi TT 1.8 TFSI Sport

Price as tested: £24,070; 0-62mph: 7.2sec; Top speed: 140mph; Kerb weight: 1240kg; Economy: 44.1mpg (combined); CO2: 149g/km; Engine: 4 cyls in line, 1798cc, petrol; Max power: 158bhp at 4500-6300rpm; Max torque: 184lb ft at 1500-4500rpm; Gearbox: 6-spd manual

Join the debate

Comments
19

21 March 2012

This is the most appealing TT in the range in my opinion. Since the chassis isn't all that great, lower powered versions are probably better to drive.

21 March 2012

A TT less powerful than a A1 1.4? I can't quite understand it...

21 March 2012

To me it's the most appealing model in the range, getting to 60 in 7.2 is plenty quick enough, for me anyway.

 

Hydrogen cars just went POP

21 March 2012

[quote xxxx]

To me it's the most appealing model in the range, getting to 60 in 7.2 is plenty quick enough, for me anyway.

[/quote]

Definitely. For most people 0-60 in 7.2 and a 140 mph top speed is more than enough, the price is helpfully lower, and it's usefully down a band on tax, so this is a good extension of the range,. I bet it will outsell the 2.0 considerably.

Anyone who wants more performance can simply buy a bigger engined model.

21 March 2012

[quote Submariner Redux]

Definitely. For most people 0-60 in 7.2 and a 140 mph top speed is more than enough, the price is helpfully lower, and it's usefully down a band on tax, so this is a good extension of the range,. I bet it will outsell the 2.0 considerably.

Anyone who wants more performance can simply buy a bigger engined model.

[/quote]

Yes, but it should exist a limit to downsizing for a car that it is sold even with 350+ bhp that "aims at the new Porsche Boxster and upcoming second-generation Porsche Cayman".

Because for some people even a 1.4 TT with 140bhp capable of 0-60 in 8.5 and 135mph top speed could be enough...

21 March 2012

[quote matsoc]

Because for some people even a 1.4 TT with 140bhp capable of 0-60 in 8.5 and 135mph top speed could be enough...

[/quote]

Of course it could, and that would be fine too. That's still faster than 19 out of 20 cars in the average supermarket car park. Half these cars never get past 80 mph, and a lot of them never get out of town.

Performance is irrelevant for an awful lot of buyers of fashion accessory cars like the TT, as with the Scirocco which does use the 1.4T (and both use the 2.0D as well, of course)

The TT has never really been a Boxster / Cayman rival: no front drive car based on a family hatchback floorpan and mechanicals really could be, regardless of what a marketing department might say in their press releases.

21 March 2012

[quote Submariner Redux]

Anyone who wants more performance can simply buy a bigger engined model.

[/quote] Or spend around £350 on a sensible/modest remap - ie, adding approx 30bhp and 25lb-ft - which should be well-within the engine and transmission's OE spec tolerances?

21 March 2012

[quote 6th.replicant][quote Submariner Redux]

Anyone who wants more performance can simply buy a bigger engined model.

[/quote] Or spend around £350 on a sensible/modest remap - ie, adding approx 30bhp and 25lb-ft - which should be well-within the engine and transmission's OE spec tolerances?[/quote] Indeed but that would lead to loss of waranty, isn't it? Otherwise I also find this to be the most appealing TT version and I don't fancy much Audis...

21 March 2012

Loss of warranty on anything resulting from the map, most decent companies will give their own mechanical warranty covering serious failure. Of course when you destroy a clutch in 2years that wont help but this is the chance you take. I think this is a very appealing package, given what a similarly powered mid size hatch costs these days!

22 March 2012

Have to agree - it sounds like a great combination.

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