In spite of iffy reliability reports for the first car, an Audi TT has always been a safe place to put your cash.

All models hold their value well, especially the roadster. After three years any TT should still be worth over 50 percent of what it cost new. A similarly priced BMW coupé M Sport will struggle to make it to 45 percent of its original value three years down the line. 

In spite of iffy reliability reports for the first car, an Audi TT has always been a safe place to put your cash.

Company car users will find the diesel TT tempting, as it incurs an attractively low benefit-in-kind tax liability. Day-to-day running costs should be very reasonable, too; we managed a best economy figure of 48.1mpg on the diesel and an overall average of 34.1mpg, which is far from shabby from what is marketed as a sports car, even a diesel-powered one.

Even the petrol-powered TTs aren’t that thirsty – we’d expect to knock at least 10mpg off the diesel’s figures, but that remains impressive for the performance on offer.

The RS presents the greatest threat of residual value decline, but again the forecasts are for a marginally better performance in this regard than its competitors.

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The probability is strengthened by the fact that few will be heading to the UK. That rarity will heighten the pleasure of owning it, as will its slightly better-than-average economy and the reduced tyre wear that all-wheel drive brings.

But with real-world fuel consumption in the low 20s, this will not be a cheap car to run.

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