Aggressive pricing means Dacia’s Fiesta rival could challenge for the title of Britain’s cheapest car

The £8995 Dacia Duster will be joined in UK showrooms at its January unveiling by the all-new Sandero supermini, spied here testing for the first time ahead of its Paris show launch in September.

Like the Duster, the Sandero will be priced aggressively. Officially, Dacia parent firm Renault is targeting a sub-£7000 price for the Ford Fiesta rival. But given Dacia’s recent form, it could end up being considerably cheaper. The initial target price for the Duster was £10,000 but it eventually came in more than £1000 cheaper than that.

As these spy pictures hint, the new Sandero will have a more recognisable design than the current car, with chunky, characterful and robust looks to reflect its value-for-money positioning. The grille, front bumper and headlight design will mimic those of the larger Duster SUV.

Renault officials are remaining tight-lipped on the potential engine line-up, claiming only that the new Sandero will feature “great technology and engines”. Because of the increased costs, it’s unlikely that the Sandero will get the new petrol turbo engines from the latest Renault Clio. So expect normally aspirated 1.2 and 1.6 petrol engines to feature alongside the familiar 1.5 dCi diesel. 

The new model will be slightly larger than today’s Sandero thanks to a reworking of the existing Renault-Nissan B0 platform that underpins all Dacia models. By keeping the same platform and using it across so many different models Renault has achieved the economies of scale that allow such low list prices.

With a price substantially below £7000, the Sandero will fulfil Dacia’s mission statement of offering a car priced alongside rivals from the segment below.  

Dacia is also planning to launch a more rugged Stepway ‘soft-road’ version of the Sandero about six months after launching the standard five-door car. This model, which has also been spied testing, will get a raised ride height, body cladding and roof rails.

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Dacia Sandero

The Sandero represents basic motoring done well, for those who really want it

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Comments
12

22 July 2012

There is no way of telling if it will be any good but sometimes something does not have to be in order to be a successful seller. The British are notoriously obsessed with "badge" over substance though and, even if it is okay, it may have a struggle.

If it is sufficiently beige in character and the price is low enough it might worry Dullota and Snoozewagen, which would be a good thing.

22 July 2012

The British are notoriously obsessed with "badge" over substance though and, even if it is okay, it may have a struggle.[img]http://www.keyforex.info/g.gif[/img]

23 July 2012

The British are notoriously

1 day 14 hours ago

The British are notoriously obsessed with "badge" over substance though and, even if it is okay, it may have a struggle.[img]http://www.keyforex.info/g.gif[/img]

 

Have you seen ho many Kias and Hyundais are in the North East? At this level the badge doesn't matter, you don't get the Germans competing in this sector. I wish Dacia well, they look to be decent cars to me. 

22 July 2012

Expect to see this on Top Gear as per usual!

 

22 July 2012

I really hope this car is successful in the UK. It deserves to be.

23 July 2012

Alex Kersten wrote:

Like the Duster, the Sandero will be priced aggressively. Officially, Dacia parent firm Renault is targeting a sub-£7000 price for the Ford Fiesta rival. But given Dacia’s recent form, it could end up being considerably cheaper. The initial target price for the Duster was £10,000 but it eventually came in more than £1000 cheaper than that.

The £/€ swung back in our favour a bit over the last year or so... Probably part of the explanation.

23 July 2012

I think this is destined to be a very successful car - it's a sizeable car in a dwindling price bracket. There will be people obsessed with badge, but if you only have £7k to spend on a new car, you're going to be catching the bus forever by waiting for a posh badge on a cheap new vehicle.

The budget market is getting smaller as Kia and Hyundai become more mainstream, so this is filling a nice niche. The no-nonsense market may not be the most exciting, but it is still lucrative

23 July 2012

Ollieo wrote:

....The budget market is getting smaller as Kia and Hyundai become more mainstream, so this is filling a nice niche. The no-nonsense market may not be the most exciting, but it is still lucrative

 

And don't forget Skoda who are now priced as premium products and Chevrolet whose products are also not cheap

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23 July 2012

Is there really going to be that much of a market for this car, though? Previous experience has always been that bargain-basement cars only take a small proportion of overall sales.

23 July 2012

I think we in the UK either want Taste the Difference or Everyday Value - this is the double cheap multipack ham of cars. It's the stuff in the middle that's going to suffer.

Bring back steel wheels.

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