Golf 2.0-litre TDI BMT kicks off process that could extend into 2017; around 15,000 Golfs in Europe are due to be fixed

Volkswagen is starting the technical fixes for its Golf models following the ongoing emissions scandal by recalling 2.0-litre TDI BlueMotion engined cars in Germany.

The recall is likely to include both hatchback and estate models, and is the first wave of a total of 15,000 affected Golfs in Europe. Other models are due to follow once their fixes have been approved by the German Federal Motor Transport Authority (KBA); the Passat is the most likely next candidate.

VW UK has confirmed that no further approvals are needed before UK cars are recalled, so affected British owners can also expect to be contacted by their local dealership for a free appointment for the fix to be done.

Volkswagen is doing the recalls to address issues with its cars’ software after it was found that several models in the USA were running defeat devices to cheat emissions tests.

The car maker says it has been working at full speed to design and implement technical solutions, with Europe so far being the only region to come to a successful fix agreement.

The fixes are said to have no effect on fuel economy and car performance, which has led VW to argue it won’t be required to offer compensation to affected owners. This contrasts with what is happening in the US, where it is thought the fixes could impact performance. As a result, affected US owners are entitled to a $5000 payout or the option of having the car bought back by VW.

VW boss Herbert Diess believes that once more Golf variants are recalled, the Passat will be the next model to be fixed. “We have very successful results on test beds, but it takes time to refit a diesel engine: you need to test it at high and low temperatures, [at different] altitudes and look into all customer expectations to prove all customer expectations are met,” he said.

“Passat customers in Germany will get the work within the next few weeks, and Golf customers within a week - and this will roll out for all our customers quickly.”

Volkswagen hopes to fix the 11 million affected cars worldwide before the close of this year, but has admitted it could stretch into 2017.

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Comments
12

28 April 2016
Still want to see a before and after dyno test... any more than a couple of horses missing and I would want compensation.

db

28 April 2016
Why not get rid of all pollution laws and take us back in time to emission fog in the UK. Its not the law that's stupid its the engineers and board of directors at VW thinking it was and still is acceptable to lie to consumers and those who breath in their fumes. Take a trip to China and breath in the un regulated air, it wont be long before you are coughing your lungs out !

28 April 2016
db wrote:

Why not get rid of all pollution laws and take us back in time to emission fog in the UK. Its not the law that's stupid its the engineers and board of directors at VW thinking it was and still is acceptable to lie to consumers and those who breath in their fumes. Take a trip to China and breath in the un regulated air, it wont be long before you are coughing your lungs out !

China has virtually no diesel cars so the pollution must be from all those obnoxious petrol cars then.

28 April 2016
autocar wrote:

Golf 2.0-litre TDI BMT...

OK I'm now confused. There's mention of the 2.0tdi BMT accompanied by a picture of a mk7 Golf in the above article. But I was under the impression all mk7 2.0tdi engines were Euro6 compliant and Euro6 engines weren't affected by the recall? Or have I got it wrong?

28 April 2016
I think Volkswagen should offer these unfortunate owners more than complementary tea and coffee to keep their custom. From an owner's viewpoint I am not sure why I would voluntarily want my car tinkered with?

28 April 2016
I certainly will not buy again due to the lousy attitude to the Uk and Euro customers,lack of compensation offerred ,although originally it was muted.Anyway the 1.6 diesel engines and 1.4tsi petrol are crap on economy supposed to get 64 mpg and 60 mpg achieving 41-44 mpg and 38 for the petrol

28 April 2016
People keep banging on about the poor VW consumer, and I must admit to having some sympathy for this argument, albeit very limited. VW should really be paying everyone else who's had to breathe in this noxious crap - if you come up close behind one of these on a bike you realise what horrible substances they're puthering out. In reality, the government should place a moratorium on sales of all diesel cars unless they can demonstrate compliance in real world on the road to EURO 6 standards. Very few cars can do this (although ironically VW perhaps are better at manufacturing these cars than most others!).

____ !

28 April 2016
IMO the only way to fix these cars is to remove the engine and replace it with something none diesel (preferably modern like electric). Whilst the concern here is regarding nitrous oxides, diesel cars (and especially buses) produce very high levels of PM10s (sub 10 micron particulate matter) which are observed to have more profound effects on lung tissue and likely more carcinogenic. Diesel is a dead technology, the values will start haemorrhaging soon.

____ !

28 April 2016
ersatz wrote:

IMO the only way to fix these cars is to remove the engine and replace it with something none diesel (preferably modern like electric). Whilst the concern here is regarding nitrous oxides, diesel cars (and especially buses) produce very high levels of PM10s (sub 10 micron particulate matter) which are observed to have more profound effects on lung tissue and likely more carcinogenic. Diesel is a dead technology, the values will start haemorrhaging soon.

Euro VI cars, and euro V, produce very few particulates as they are fitted with particulate filters. It is direct injection petrol engined cars that are having problems meeting regulations on particulates. The very small particles <2.5 microns produced by petrol cars that can cross from your airways into your bloodstream are the really dangerous particles. In recent research carried out in London travelling on a train exposes you to more particulates than in the street, underground trains are some of the worst polluters for particulates plus old diesel trains but even modern electric trains produce many particulates from the rails, wheels and brakes.

29 April 2016
Campervan wrote:
ersatz wrote:

IMO the only way to fix these cars is to remove the engine and replace it with something none diesel (preferably modern like electric). Whilst the concern here is regarding nitrous oxides, diesel cars (and especially buses) produce very high levels of PM10s (sub 10 micron particulate matter) which are observed to have more profound effects on lung tissue and likely more carcinogenic. Diesel is a dead technology, the values will start haemorrhaging soon.

Euro VI cars, and euro V, produce very few particulates as they are fitted with particulate filters. It is direct injection petrol engined cars that are having problems meeting regulations on particulates. The very small particles <2.5 microns produced by petrol cars that can cross from your airways into your bloodstream are the really dangerous particles. In recent research carried out in London travelling on a train exposes you to more particulates than in the street, underground trains are some of the worst polluters for particulates plus old diesel trains but even modern electric trains produce many particulates from the rails, wheels and brakes.

If the diesel particles don’t get you the NOx will. Just read the WHO report on diesel fumes.

 

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