Currently reading: Volkswagen recalls diesel Golfs for first wave of emissions fixes
Golf 2.0-litre TDI BMT kicks off process that could extend into 2017; around 15,000 Golfs in Europe are due to be fixed
Sam Sheehan
News
2 mins read
28 April 2016

Volkswagen is starting the technical fixes for its Golf models following the ongoing emissions scandal by recalling 2.0-litre TDI BlueMotion engined cars in Germany.

The recall is likely to include both hatchback and estate models, and is the first wave of a total of 15,000 affected Golfs in Europe. Other models are due to follow once their fixes have been approved by the German Federal Motor Transport Authority (KBA); the Passat is the most likely next candidate.

VW UK has confirmed that no further approvals are needed before UK cars are recalled, so affected British owners can also expect to be contacted by their local dealership for a free appointment for the fix to be done.

Volkswagen is doing the recalls to address issues with its cars’ software after it was found that several models in the USA were running defeat devices to cheat emissions tests.

The car maker says it has been working at full speed to design and implement technical solutions, with Europe so far being the only region to come to a successful fix agreement.

The fixes are said to have no effect on fuel economy and car performance, which has led VW to argue it won’t be required to offer compensation to affected owners. This contrasts with what is happening in the US, where it is thought the fixes could impact performance. As a result, affected US owners are entitled to a $5000 payout or the option of having the car bought back by VW.

VW boss Herbert Diess believes that once more Golf variants are recalled, the Passat will be the next model to be fixed. “We have very successful results on test beds, but it takes time to refit a diesel engine: you need to test it at high and low temperatures, [at different] altitudes and look into all customer expectations to prove all customer expectations are met,” he said.

“Passat customers in Germany will get the work within the next few weeks, and Golf customers within a week - and this will roll out for all our customers quickly.”

Volkswagen hopes to fix the 11 million affected cars worldwide before the close of this year, but has admitted it could stretch into 2017.

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valspar 29 April 2016

reliability

My Skoda had several PDF warning light problems until they updated the software. Am I to expect that when they update it this time the problems will reoccur?
ersatz 28 April 2016

I suspect it is possible to

I suspect it is possible to be more wrong. Different size particulates have different effects and it is true that the underground and diesel trains are particularly imbued with their presence. Nonetheless, you are making assumptions regarding 'test' compliance and real world compliance. Whilst we know that the amount of nitrous oxides generated on the road is vastly in excess of that in the test, little attention to my knowledge has been paid to differential particulate generation. You only need to see the puff of black smoke wafting out the back of a Ford S Max diesel as it accelerates to know it is generating vastly in excess of what will be measured in the lab. Finally, the particulates are still there, just filtered. These filters sap a large amount of the vehicle's power whilst additionally blocking hence a number of disreputable garages will cut a hole in it -then your Euro 5,6 or even 7 are meaningless. Diesels were sold to us on grounds of low (relatively) CO2 generation, but real world testing also shows this is not the case. They are a dying technology and I strongly suspect in the boardrooms of leading car manufacturers their future has already been decided.
ersatz 28 April 2016

How to fix them

IMO the only way to fix these cars is to remove the engine and replace it with something none diesel (preferably modern like electric). Whilst the concern here is regarding nitrous oxides, diesel cars (and especially buses) produce very high levels of PM10s (sub 10 micron particulate matter) which are observed to have more profound effects on lung tissue and likely more carcinogenic. Diesel is a dead technology, the values will start haemorrhaging soon.
Campervan 28 April 2016

You could not be more wrong ersatz

ersatz wrote:

IMO the only way to fix these cars is to remove the engine and replace it with something none diesel (preferably modern like electric). Whilst the concern here is regarding nitrous oxides, diesel cars (and especially buses) produce very high levels of PM10s (sub 10 micron particulate matter) which are observed to have more profound effects on lung tissue and likely more carcinogenic. Diesel is a dead technology, the values will start haemorrhaging soon.

Euro VI cars, and euro V, produce very few particulates as they are fitted with particulate filters. It is direct injection petrol engined cars that are having problems meeting regulations on particulates. The very small particles <2.5 microns produced by petrol cars that can cross from your airways into your bloodstream are the really dangerous particles. In recent research carried out in London travelling on a train exposes you to more particulates than in the street, underground trains are some of the worst polluters for particulates plus old diesel trains but even modern electric trains produce many particulates from the rails, wheels and brakes.

xxxx 29 April 2016

WHO Scientific report

Campervan wrote:
ersatz wrote:

IMO the only way to fix these cars is to remove the engine and replace it with something none diesel (preferably modern like electric). Whilst the concern here is regarding nitrous oxides, diesel cars (and especially buses) produce very high levels of PM10s (sub 10 micron particulate matter) which are observed to have more profound effects on lung tissue and likely more carcinogenic. Diesel is a dead technology, the values will start haemorrhaging soon.

Euro VI cars, and euro V, produce very few particulates as they are fitted with particulate filters. It is direct injection petrol engined cars that are having problems meeting regulations on particulates. The very small particles <2.5 microns produced by petrol cars that can cross from your airways into your bloodstream are the really dangerous particles. In recent research carried out in London travelling on a train exposes you to more particulates than in the street, underground trains are some of the worst polluters for particulates plus old diesel trains but even modern electric trains produce many particulates from the rails, wheels and brakes.

If the diesel particles don’t get you the NOx will. Just read the WHO report on diesel fumes.