Two new diesel engines, more standard equipment and improved interior refreshed large SUV
16 September 2019

The updated Renault Koleos large SUV will cost from £28,195 when it goes on sale in the UK in November.

The new version of the model was first revealed at the Shanghai motor show, and receives a number of changes to bring it into line with the recently refreshed Kadjar sibling.

External changes are as subtle as they are on the Kadjar and include an altered grille, new skid plates front and rear and additional chrome. LED headlights are now standard fit across the range, while new two-tone alloy wheels and a Vintage Red paint scheme are added.

Interior upgrades include new soft-touch materials, trim details and two-stage reclining rear seats on all models. A new pedestrian detection function has been added to the active emergency braking system, while the infotainment now gets full-screen Apple CarPlay capability. 

Renault has also added two new diesel engines to the Koleos. The first is a 148bhp 1.8-litre unit, replacing the 1.6-litre diesel in the outgoing model. It’s front-wheel-drive only, puts out 250lb ft of torque and is claimed to emit 143g/km of CO2 emissions. A new 2.0-litre also features with 187bhp and 280lb ft of torque, claiming 150g/km of CO2. 

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The marque has seemingly taken the opportunity to make both engines CVT-only, reflecting the decreased popularity of manual transmissions in this class. Greater refinement is also claimed, while the more powerful diesel comes with an intelligent all-wheel-drive system. 

Alongside the material changes, Renault has also simplified the Koleos range. Two trim levels are now offered: Iconic and GT-Line.

Iconic models receive kit including a 18in alloy wheels, a 7in touchscreen, front and rear parking sensors, a rear parking camera, LED headlights, automative lights and wipers, and heated and cooled cup holders. Prices start from £28,195 for the 148bhp dCi 150, and £31,195 for the 187bhp dCi 190.

GT-Line trim adds 18in alloy wheels, an 8.7in touchscreen, an electric tailgate, leather seats and heated electrically adjustable front seats. That model costs £30,195 and £33,195 for the dCi 150 and dCi 190 respectively.

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Comments
21

6 June 2019

Headline could have been 'more engines but lesser gearboxes'. Will cost sales

6 June 2019
xxxx wrote:

Headline could have been 'more engines but lesser gearboxes'. Will cost sales

Er why? there is nothing wrong with modern CVT gearboxes, if driven they way they are designed to be driven, not everyone drives like they stole it, they are perfect for inner city motoring, which is where most of these will be driven anyway, the majority of Japanese manufacturers favour CVT gearboxes, there must be  a reason for that, they also appear to be robust and reliable. 

The majority of customers in this segment are not really enthusiasts, and probably couldnt tell a CVT from a torque convertor anyway.. 

6 June 2019
Citytiger wrote:

xxxx wrote:

Headline could have been 'more engines but lesser gearboxes'. Will cost sales

Er why? there is nothing wrong with modern CVT gearboxes, if driven they way they are designed to be driven, not everyone drives like they stole it, they are perfect for inner city motoring, which is where most of these will be driven anyway, the majority of Japanese manufacturers favour CVT gearboxes, there must be  a reason for that, they also appear to be robust and reliable. 

The majority of customers in this segment are not really enthusiasts, and probably couldnt tell a CVT from a torque convertor anyway.. 

Why will it cost sales? isn't it obvious.  Some people might want a diesel with a manual gearbox, some people prefer DSG to CVT boxes regardless of what YOU prefer.  It's basic maths!

6 June 2019
xxxx wrote:

Citytiger wrote:

xxxx wrote:

Headline could have been 'more engines but lesser gearboxes'. Will cost sales

Er why? there is nothing wrong with modern CVT gearboxes, if driven they way they are designed to be driven, not everyone drives like they stole it, they are perfect for inner city motoring, which is where most of these will be driven anyway, the majority of Japanese manufacturers favour CVT gearboxes, there must be  a reason for that, they also appear to be robust and reliable. 

The majority of customers in this segment are not really enthusiasts, and probably couldnt tell a CVT from a torque convertor anyway.. 

Why will it cost sales? isn't it obvious.  Some people might want a diesel with a manual gearbox, some people prefer DSG to CVT boxes regardless of what YOU prefer.  It's basic maths!

Some people may not want a DSG gearbox because they are inherently unreliable, some people dont care what gearbox it has or what engine its got as long as its an SUV, its not what I prefer, its what market research has told Renault, it may increase sales..

Oh and not everyone wants a VAG - DSG is a VAG designation for a dual clutch gearbox.. 

Its basic maths? 

Is it really? 

6 June 2019
Citytiger wrote:

xxxx wrote:

Citytiger wrote:

xxxx wrote:

Headline could have been 'more engines but lesser gearboxes'. Will cost sales

Er why? there is nothing wrong with modern CVT gearboxes, if driven they way they are designed to be driven, not everyone drives like they stole it, they are perfect for inner city motoring, which is where most of these will be driven anyway, the majority of Japanese manufacturers favour CVT gearboxes, there must be  a reason for that, they also appear to be robust and reliable. 

The majority of customers in this segment are not really enthusiasts, and probably couldnt tell a CVT from a torque convertor anyway.. 

Why will it cost sales? isn't it obvious.  Some people might want a diesel with a manual gearbox, some people prefer DSG to CVT boxes regardless of what YOU prefer.  It's basic maths!

Some people may not want a DSG gearbox because they are inherently unreliable, some people dont care what gearbox it has or what engine its got as long as its an SUV, its not what I prefer, its what market research has told Renault, it may increase sales..

Oh and not everyone wants a VAG - DSG is a VAG designation for a dual clutch gearbox.. 

Its basic maths? 

Is it really? 

You don't get it. no manual and CVT only will turn some OFF, i.e. CVT only will cost sales. Imagine if they made it manual only, or petrol only, or white only, it would result in fewer sales.

What don't you get?

6 June 2019
xxxx wrote:

Citytiger wrote:

xxxx wrote:

Headline could have been 'more engines but lesser gearboxes'. Will cost sales

Er why? there is nothing wrong with modern CVT gearboxes, if driven they way they are designed to be driven, not everyone drives like they stole it, they are perfect for inner city motoring, which is where most of these will be driven anyway, the majority of Japanese manufacturers favour CVT gearboxes, there must be  a reason for that, they also appear to be robust and reliable. 

The majority of customers in this segment are not really enthusiasts, and probably couldnt tell a CVT from a torque convertor anyway.. 

Why will it cost sales? isn't it obvious.  Some people might want a diesel with a manual gearbox, some people prefer DSG to CVT boxes regardless of what YOU prefer.  It's basic maths!

Most people couldnt care less/dont even know what type of auto gearbox their car uses, its only car enthusiasts like us - a tiny minority of car users - who do know what type of auto gearbox their car has.

CVT is far more effieicent than DSG, which is why manufacturers use it, I m surprised you of all people, need to be reminded of this.

16 September 2019
typos1 wrote:

xxxx wrote:

Citytiger wrote:

xxxx wrote:

Headline could have been 'more engines but lesser gearboxes'. Will cost sales

Er why? there is nothing wrong with modern CVT gearboxes, if driven they way they are designed to be driven, not everyone drives like they stole it, they are perfect for inner city motoring, which is where most of these will be driven anyway, the majority of Japanese manufacturers favour CVT gearboxes, there must be  a reason for that, they also appear to be robust and reliable. 

The majority of customers in this segment are not really enthusiasts, and probably couldnt tell a CVT from a torque convertor anyway.. 

Why will it cost sales? isn't it obvious.  Some people might want a diesel with a manual gearbox, some people prefer DSG to CVT boxes regardless of what YOU prefer.  It's basic maths!

Most people couldnt care less/dont even know what type of auto gearbox their car uses, ...

They will if it whines like you

6 June 2019

these already only come in an auto with 2 models

6 June 2019

That and other reasons might go some way to explain poor sales across Europe,

16 September 2019

IN Reply to xxx I have a CVT brilliant go to Suffolk from Nottingham its easy peasy put into auto cruise and so relaxing . As has been said not evry one is a crazy away from the lights speedo. With current trafiic condtions its a no brainer CVT the way forward I say

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