Third known incident involving Tesla's autonomous driving function occurs in California; driver and passenger unharmed

A Tesla Model X using the manufacturer’s Autopilot system was involved in a crash in the US on Sunday.

The driver and passenger were unharmed, and Tesla suggested the system was not being used properly.

Data shows that Autosteer was used on an undivided mountain road, and the driver’s hands were off the steering wheel when the electric SUV swerved and hit a post next to the road in Montana, California.

Tesla’s terms of use recommends keeping hands on the steering wheel at all times when Autosteer is used, and the manufacturer has advised against using it at high speeds on undivided roads.

It is the third known crash involving Tesla’s autonomous driving function, one of which resulted in a fatality when a Model S collided with a truck’s trailer in its path.

The other incident resulted in a Model X hitting a guard rail on a highway in Pennsylvania before flipping onto its roof. The driver and passenger were both injured, but police later charged the driver with careless driving. It is not yet clear how, or if, Autopilot was involved.

There have so far been no reported incidents in the UK involving Autopilot, and Tesla boss Elon Musk has said the company will continue with its autonomous plans.

Other companies' autonomous system developments are gathering pace.

Nissan has launched its Propilot system in a Japanese model. Propilot is set to be introduced in the Nissan Qashqai in the UK next year.

Jaguar Land Rover has also unveiled its autonomous ambitions for the future, pledging to test 100 self-driving models on roads in England over the next four years.

Read more: why autonomous cars are inevitable

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8

13 July 2016
In the same way that old cruise control instructions on motorhomes had to state "Do not set the cruise and leave your seat...." Looks like we need to link GPS to road type and only allow autonomous mode on major roads. (My old microwave also stated in the instruction manual "do not use to dry your pets..."FFS)

 

 

 

13 July 2016
Even in it's most simplest form it's proving expensive and pointless, yes to adaptive cruise control but other than that the 'TRUE' autonomous car is so far off it doesn't deserve any more column inches for 25 or more years.

 

Hydrogen cars just went POP

13 July 2016
Sooner or later, as autonomous technology becomes available on more cars, owner's misuse despite warnings will result in more accidents. Moreover, when fully autonomous cars hit the market it will only be a matter of time before an accident, shown to be the fault of the autonomous car for whatever reason, will result in a manufacturer being liable for a heavy payout for damages and possibly prosecution, followed by autonomous tech being quietly dropped.

Citroëniste.

13 July 2016
Bob Cholmondeley wrote:

Moreover, when fully autonomous cars hit the market it will only be a matter of time before an accident, shown to be the fault of the autonomous car for whatever reason, will result in a manufacturer being liable for a heavy payout for damages and possibly prosecution, followed by autonomous tech being quietly dropped.

Exactly. Look how the "defeat device" emissions scandal has nearly brought VW to its knees.

Imagine when, heaven forbid, more people end up being killed by a Tesla like the one last month. I can forsee companies like Tesla scaling back this autonomous driving tech and going for the simpler 'driver assist' type features as a happy medium.

13 July 2016
Difference is you don't drive a 2 ton microwave at high speeds. Tesla's system is dangerous. Contrary to other systems that require short interval inputs from driver to stay active, Tesla's keep driving the car. It give people a false sense of autonomous driving, and they trust it more and more until the accident happens. Sorry but it's just the human way, hence why others don't let their system act that way. There are a lot of videos on YT with people using their autopilot in scary ways. Because the system LETS them.

All this because Tesla wants to be seen as the leader in tech. And to cover their a$$, they tell people you have to be observant all the time. Even the name they chose for pure marketing reasons, Autopilot, is helping to mislead people.

Dan

13 July 2016
Perhaps too simple a question to ask - if the vehicle knows where it is, why is it not "clever" enough to know which roads are suitable and which are not? Multi-lane freeways/motorways should be easy. Tick. Anything else, maybe not.

13 July 2016
The system is called "autonomous" it should therefore require no driver (third party) input to work. If it does it is by definition not "autonomous". Tesla should therefore stop marketing it as such. As a practising lawyer it seems to me that as soon as people like Mr Musk, the boards of Audi, BMW, Mercedes-Benz etc realise that if (when/ it has already happened) their systems kill someone they could be liable to prosecution for corporate manslaughter they will forget about this idiocy until the technology is "mature". Probably around 2100 or at least after they are dead and gone.

6 December 2016
What does it mean not used properly?

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