Sunderland will also continue to produce the Juke, making it a European hub for Nissan SUVs and quelling fears Brexit could shrink the site

The next-generation Nissan Qashqai and X-Trail models will be built alongside the Juke at the Nissan’s Sunderland production plant, meaning the factory in the north east of England will become a European hub for crossover production.

The move will ensure the survival of more than 7000 jobs in Sunderland, with Nissan confirming that the decision was made following strong support from the British Government, which is working to ensure the UK’s automotive industry remains strong during Britain’s ejection from the European Union.

Nissan's announcement ends rumours that the Sunderland plant could downsize following the Brexit vote.

Chairman and CEO of Nissan Carlos Ghosn (pictured above) said this morning “I am pleased to announce that Nissan will continue to invest in Sunderland. Our employees there continue to make the plant a globally competitive powerhouse, producing high-quality, high-value products every day.

“The support and assurances of the UK Government enabled us to decide that the next-generation Qashqai and X-Trail will be produced at Sunderland. I welcome British Prime Minister Theresa May’s commitment to the automotive industry in Britain and to the development of an overall industrial strategy.”

The news follows the announcement from the Office for National Statistics that Britain's economy grew by 0.5% between July and September.

The next-generation Qashqai will arrive with sophisticated autonomous technology. The future X-Trail was previewed in a concept earlier this year.

Opinion: Nissan's commitment to Sunderland is a big boost for Britain

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Nissan Qashqai

Nissan's second crossover album goes platinum, but can a light refresh to the Qashqai and some added extras help it hold off the advances from the Seat Ateca and Skoda Kodiaq

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Comments
19

27 October 2016
Does this mean Nissan is privy to the UK government negotiating position, which is apparently too sensitive for the rest of us to know? Good news though.

27 October 2016
scrap wrote:

Does this mean Nissan is privy to the UK government negotiating position, which is apparently too sensitive for the rest of us to know? Good news though.

No, but it does make sense with this plant reported as being the most efficient in Europe plus the GBP makes its products cheap In terms of Euros. It does help confirm that the remoaners are wrong.

27 October 2016
Campervan wrote:
scrap wrote:

Does this mean Nissan is privy to the UK government negotiating position, which is apparently too sensitive for the rest of us to know? Good news though.

No, but it does make sense with this plant reported as being the most efficient in Europe plus the GBP makes its products cheap In terms of Euros. It does help confirm that the remoaners are wrong.

You mean those who may have a different opinion and outlook on life to yourself are wrong. Let's leave nonsense like that to the Daily Express shall we. No one can bank on a favourable exchange rate for exports staying in place. The issue that will impact on Sunderland long term is the trade arrangements that will exist post Brexit. As noted in this article most of Sunderlands production is exported to mainland Europe so it is vital that they don't suffer from trade barriers after the U.K. Leaves. It would have been a disaster for the government if Nissan had not made this announcement and inevitable that some sort of deal has been struck to protect Nissan if Brexit ends up being hard.

27 October 2016
We don't know what agreements have been made between the government and Nissan. It was utterly vital for the government to make Nissan a beacon of Brexit, so who knows what promises they have made (remember Ghosn's comments on compensating for tariffs?).

The bigger question is this one manufacturer for one industry being carefully nursed, or will all manufacturers benefit. We still have not seen any positive outlooks in our area of automotive supply, so we suspect there's been some serious sweet deal for Nissan.

28 October 2016
scrap wrote:

Does this mean Nissan is privy to the UK government negotiating position, which is apparently too sensitive for the rest of us to know? Good news though.

no it means the decision to build the X-Trail here had been taken 3 years ago!!! and the "new" Qashqai is a midlife facelift (again always going to be made here) … and that means the real big news is --- they still haven't made the decision to build the new 2020 Qashqai in Sunderland yet!!!

28 October 2016
the Chairman and CEO of Nissan Carlos Ghosn said:

"The support and assurances of the UK Government enabled us to decide that the next-generation Qashqai and X-Trail will be produced at Sunderland."

so maybe the " next-generation Qashqai will arrive next year " is just an Autocar intern not realising he meant the 2020 next generation Qashqai……

27 October 2016
We can only speculate but I would guess the conversation went something like this, Carlos Ghosn :-"How is the British government going to ensure a return on our investment at Sunderland with the threat of increased tariffs from the EU ?" Theresa May :-"Don't worry CG we will tell the unsuspecting British public that our exit is still going ahead while continuing to integrate behind closed doors, the EU project is fundamental to our global aspirations and very little will actually change on the ground" .

 Offence can only be taken not given- so give it back!

27 October 2016
With the Pound at an all time low against the Euro & seeing no sign of it going up in value in the next 2-3 years because of Brexit, it makes making cars in the UK very cheap.....
It probably costs less to make cars here than in Euro expensive Poland!!!! (or very expensive France, as in Renault)
That begs the question, if GM shifts Vauxhall production from Ellsmere Port to Poland will it cost them more there to build
& so they might as well stay in the UK????

27 October 2016
That argument only applies if the cars have more or less 100pc British content. Nissans will have many high value components brought in from abroad including Renault engines from France. What they gain on the swings from a low pound they loose on the roundabouts

27 October 2016
GM and others will presumably be lining up for their handouts now, since the "commitment from the UK government to ensure the Sunderland plant remains competitive" (from the Nissan press release) is presumably a large pile of cash.
Or the government is busy sucking up to one of the major pro-Brexit regions of the country before dishing out the news that there's not going to be any Brexit after all...

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