Prices have gone up every day since late March – the longest run in three and a half years

Supermarket fuel prices have risen every day since the end of March, with average prices at the big four retailers going up by more than eight pence per litre.

On 26 March, average supermarket fuel prices were 116.7p for a litre of petrol and 119.4p for diesel. They have increased to 124.7p and 127.7p respectively, according to RAC Fuel Watch data.

The weak pound and a rise in crude oil prices are to blame.

Average fuel prices across the board have risen by 8.5p - more than supermarket prices, although prices have not risen day in, day out like those of supermarket fuel. A litre of petrol is 128.3p per litre on average and diesel is 131.2p across the UK.

RAC fuel spokesman Simon Williams said: “This is the worst series of consecutive daily supermarket price rises we have seen since we began monitoring this three and a half years ago.”

These fuel prices put the UK 10th among EU member states for the price of fuel. The most expensive is the Netherlands, where drivers pay £1.47 per litre of petrol. 

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The UK’s VAT on fuel is the lowest among this top 10, while fuel duty is joint sixth highest among the 28 states measured, despite having been frozen for seven years between 2010 and 2017. The UK has the joint eighth lowest pre-tax and duty cost of fuel in the EU, according to RAC foundation data.

Williams warned that there are more increases to come. An increase of 1p per litre across the national average is expected in the coming weeks. 

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Comments
11

29 May 2018

Probably a big-a-boost for BEV's as a few million spent on advertising.

On a serious note I'm doing 30,000 miles a year so it negates any pay rise, I suspect this is the case for many people.

typos1 - Just can’t respect opinion

30 May 2018
xxxx wrote:

Probably a big-a-boost for BEV's as a few million spent on advertising.

On a serious note I'm doing 30,000 miles a year so it negates any pay rise, I suspect this is the case for many people.

yep, I do 25k per year. 


"Work hard and be nice to people"

29 May 2018
Good to see Autocar bring up this issue which is mildly irritating for now. The other day I paid £1.38 or £1.379 if you like (what's that fractioning of the penny all about?) for Shell Premium. Fuel price is quite another dirty racket. They probably eek enough taxes and duties out of the price to pay for their wars and what not!

289

29 May 2018

There is no need for Oil to be the price it is today....the planet is literally sloshing around in the stuff. This is the OPEC cartel fixing prices ...again, by limiting supply. I thought that  Cartels by their very definition were illegal and yet this continues with no control.

I have said before that fuel for vehicles is not a luxury....people need it to get around...get to work etc, meanwhile the government again cashes in with tax on tax , which is a bonus  for them in the face of increased oil prices.

There is no way that the price of fuel can be justified at more that a pound a litre...in my view the government should have a floating tax rate which maintains that price at a pound by varying tax take against wholesale cost.

They wont of course, as they are far too greedy to actually give a damn about all the squeezed families.....and then have the cheek to chastise people for not saving enough money for the future. Bastards!

29 May 2018

As the price of fuel rises, so does the VAT the government receives, but perhaps just as significant is that the increase in petrol prices will encourage more people to adopt hybrid or electric vehicles which suits the government's emission targets. Maybe that's not such a bad thing, except the charging infrastructure isn't up to scratch yet and most EVs are either too expensive or lack sufficient range, especially for high mileage drivers.

29 May 2018
Will86 wrote:

As the price of fuel rises, so does the VAT the government receives, but perhaps just as significant is that the increase in petrol prices will encourage more people to adopt hybrid or electric vehicles which suits the government's emission targets. Maybe that's not such a bad thing, except the charging infrastructure isn't up to scratch yet and most EVs are either too expensive or lack sufficient range, especially for high mileage drivers.

 

But the government couldn't give a fig about emmisions. They just want the money, and they'll find ever more inventive ways to get it.

They'll screw the EV drivers soon enough too. Watch.

30 May 2018

No government, of any political persuasion, gives a fig about emmissions, health or housing. Most readers of these columns could look at Treasury "requirements" and save at least 5%!

Why is it a taboo subject to suggest that the country is run on more commercial lines, I have long advocated a "producer pays" policy, abolish road tax and load fuel duty to reflect usage.  I have been a company car user for over 30 years covering up to 40K PA. Why should some auld duffer in a 2K PA Bentley be battered for my excesses.  Tax should be proportional, a percentage is a percentage therefore why higher % rates for higher earners?

289

29 May 2018

.....thats great for those rich enough to invest large sums of money into buying or leasing expensive new Hybrids/EV's.

For the rest of the country they are being penalised for being less well-off....again, having to buy/run older cars.

29 May 2018

That was my point if you read my post again.

29 May 2018

 I love bet the ten pence a litre off when you spend £50.00 will be starting soon!?!

Peter Cavellini.

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