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Seat is on a roll but can the Arona, its new junior SUV, cut it in such an ultra-competitive class?

You may or may not be the sort of driver who is suggestible to the idea of trading in a hatchback for a compact crossover – but even if you’re not, you can hardly blame a car maker for selling one at the moment.

By Seat’s estimation, the global market for supermini-based pseudo-SUVs is four times as large today as it was even as recently as 2015 – and it’s expected to continue to grow just as quickly for years to come.

The Arona’s profile view is dominated by a sharply rising shoulder line that adds plenty of ‘wedge’ aesthetic and drama with it

For those reasons alone, any car manufacturer whose business depends even vaguely on volume and market share would need a very good reason not to introduce a car such as the subject of this road test: the Seat Arona.

And that’s why so many have. In a segment where the likes of Renault, Nissan, Peugeot, Mazda, Ford and others are already represented, we’ve seen the likes of the Citroën C3 Aircross, MG ZS,

First drives