Lamborghini's revised Huracán receives more power, greater aero and tweaked styling, and is priced from £165,256
7 January 2019

Lamborghini has pulled the covers off its updated and more powerful Huracán, following a number of preview images posted in the past few days.

The new-for-2019 Ferrari 488 rival now adopts the Huracán Evo nameplate, reflecting its changes. The images reveal a number of styling changes designed to offer "aerodynamic superiority", with a new front bumper bringing enlarged intakes and an integrated splitter.

Side-on, there's also revised intakes, but the most notable changes are at the rear, with a new full-width intake echoing that of its recently updated Audi R8 sibling. New twin exhaust outlets are positioned higher up the rear fascia, while a new integrated spoiler better balances downforce and drag.  A super-slippery underbody also features. 

Following on from the Nurburgring record-holding Huracán Performante launched last year, the standard Huracán now benefits from the same power output from the naturally-aspirated 5.2-litre V10. The 29bhp boost, up to 631bhp, and 600Nm of torque means a 0-62mph time of 2.9sec (down 0.3sec) and 0-124mph in nine seconds. The top speed is unchanged at 201mph.

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Lamborghini has also focused its efforts on the Huracan's chassis, but instead of messing with the nuts and bolts it has introduced a new chassis control system. Called Lamborghini Dinamica Veicolo Integrata (LDVI) the system is set to control every aspect of the car's dynamics. Sensors constantly monitor the vehicle's acceleration, roll, pitch and yaw rate and can actively predict driver behaviour, while a new generation of magneto rheological adaptive dampers is brought in.

Enhanced torque vectoring in the all-wheel-drive system allows traction to be directed through any of the four wheels, while Lambo has also worked on the dynamic steering system to "provide higher responsiveness in corners whiile requiring the lowest steering angles".  

The Huracán Evo's interior has benefitted from a new 8.4-inch capacitive touchscreen in the centre console. It controls everything from the climate control to the use of Apple CarPlay, with a more advanced voice command system than that in use in the Aventador. New options include a dual-camera telemetry system with a high-capacity hard disk.

In addition to the standard changes, Lamborghini has also increased the Huracán's range of personalisation options, including new wheel and colour choices. Lightweight interior materials, including forged composits and a patented 'carbon skin', are available on request. A number of upholstery options, and a range of new style packs, have also been announced.

Lambo will commence deliveries of the new Huracán in the spring, with initial pricing details at £165,256 excluding taxes. No images of the Spyder convertible have been revealed as yet, but we know that car will benefit from the same changes when it goes on sale in a couple of months. 

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Comments
16

21 September 2018
It would only be a pure drivers car if it was possible to order it with a manual box.

22 September 2018
eseaton wrote:

It would only be a pure drivers car if it was possible to order it with a manual box.

...now, I am not so black-and-white. 

World changed, cars are bigger, roads are more congested...

IMHO, the more power the car has, the more the driver benefits from automatic gearbox. This applies even more to turbo-charged cars, imho, like 911T(S).

Most drivers are not professional and, what is more important, do not drive on track. Good automatic gearbox lets a very powerful car be more exciting more of the time.

I had PDK 981 Boxster S, PDK was great in Sport mode (in Sport+ it was too high-strung for normal roads 99% of the time), but I would enjoy that car more with a manual gearbox, as it was not "overpowered". My 997T, modded and tuned, is manual... honestly I think I would enjoy this car more with a PDK, maybe because it is a bit rough and somehow old school in the way its awd works (especially with PASM off). I keep it because it is a rare breed now and it has the best 6-speed sport gearbox ever made, but every time I drive it in tight hairpins in the Alps I feel it would profit from PDK. Maybe that is why 997.2 Turbos are so popular on the second hand market (even though they do not have the Mezger any more).

I haven't driven Huracan, so I cannot say with conviction, but apriori I would say automatic gearbox makes that car more accessible and fun.

Personally, I have switched to sportbikes, but even there, the quickshifter-blipper makes riding more fun, especially on liter bikes!

4 January 2019

I think many buyers of very powerful cars prefer non-manuals because it makes it easier to drive the car when you are not trying to convince someone you are a new Senna.  They probably drive the car more often because it's less work.  But turbos can make manuals better in that you have the extra connection with the car but the low end torque means you can skip gears easily when you are feeling lazy.

4 January 2019

 Yes shifting the gears manually was a big part of driving like these,now with the automated box you can change much faster and do it perfectly everytime, if you want manual, buy an older one, not much difference in the thrill factor, it’s your choice, your money, nobody can pick holes in that idea.

Peter Cavellini.

7 January 2019
eseaton wrote:

It would only be a pure drivers car if it was possible to order it with a manual box.

A starting handle and a lever to advance/retard the ignition should be options, as well.

I've always thought that brakes on all four wheels were for nancy-boys. And don't get me started on electric lights - if oxy-acetylene isn't bright enough for you then stick to your horse and cart, mate.

22 September 2018

 I drove one for three or four laps last year and I was hooked, I’ve driven two other supercars, a McLaren and a Porsche GT3 RS, the Lamborghini was more favourite, so easy to Drive not intimidating at all, like I said hooked.....

Peter Cavellini.

22 September 2018

It always staggered me, and it still does, that some of the motoring press critcised the Huracan as being dull to look at, even bland. Sure, I don't think it's as good looking as the Gallardo but it still posesses at least the same presence, excitement and jaw dropping looks as its predecessor. Which also means it's more staggering to look at than every rival IMO.

7 January 2019
Lanehogger wrote:

It always staggered me, and it still does, that some of the motoring press critcised the Huracan as being dull to look at, even bland. Sure, I don't think it's as good looking as the Gallardo but it still posesses at least the same presence, excitement and jaw dropping looks as its predecessor. Which also means it's more staggering to look at than every rival IMO.

I think it's one of the all-time greats. It isn't ground-breaking or trend-setting but, in my opinion, together with the new Jimny, it's simply one of the best looking cars of the last twenty-odd years.

25 September 2018

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4 January 2019

I have no desire to stop people having a PDK if they want one. 

 

So I don't understand whey people want to tell me that I can't have, or shouldn't want, a manual.  I like changing gear, very much indeed.

 

I absolutely would not buy this car for that reason.  I would not buy an Alpine A110, or a Guilia Quadrifoglio (particularly as they actually build a manual for the European market). 

 

So yes, as Peter has said, I am confined to the used market.

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