Track-focused version of BMW's smallest M car revealed ahead of LA motor show debut, with carbon parts, new aero features and more power
5 November 2019

BMW’s M division is sending the current M2 off on a high with the introduction of a new, limited-edition CS model, and now it's official after leaking online yesterday.

The last-hurrah performance coupé, revealed here ahead of its first public debut at the Los Angeles motor show, goes on sale in the UK this week at a price of £75,320. Right-hand drive deliveries are planned to begin next April

Differentiating the track-focused M2 CS from the £51,425 M2 Competition are a number of exterior upgrades, such as a carbonfibre-reinforced plastic bonnet with a central air vent and a carbonfibre roof. The bonnet’s weight is claimed to be half that of the steel structure used for the M2 Competition.

Further changes include a new splitter element at the front, a unique boot spoiler and a multi-channel diffuser – all made from carbonfibre and boosting downforce. Also part of the package are new lightweight 19in forged aluminium wheels in a black or matt gold finish and a choice of four exterior paint colours.

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Power for the M2 CS comes from a reworked version of M division’s S55 engine that uses a redesigned dual-branch exhaust system with controllable flaps for acoustics. The twin-turbo 3.0-litre petrol inline six runs the same state of tune as it does in the M4 Competition, developing 444bhp at 6250rpm. That’s a 40bhp increase on the M2 Competition and gives the M2 CS a power-to-weight ratio of 286bhp per tonne. Torque stays at 405lb ft.

The increased reserves are channelled through a standard six-speed manual or optional seven-speed dual-clutch gearbox and an electronically controlled Active M differential. BMW claims a 0-62mph time of 4.2sec for the manual-equipped M2 CS and 4.0sec for the dual-clutch version. By comparison, the 404bhp M2 Competition has an official 0-62mph time of 4.4sec in manual guise.

The M2 CS’s fourth-gear 50-75mph split is put at 3.3sec for the manual car and 3.1sec for the dual-clutch model. With a Driver’s Package, which includes 245/35-profile front and 265/35-profile rear 19in Michelin Pilot Sport Cup 2 tyres as standard, the top speed is raised to 174mph.

The manual M2 CS’s fuel consumption is 27.7mpg on the WLTP cycle, with CO2 emissions of 233g/km. The dual-clutch car returns 30.1mpg and 214g/km.

Among the chassis tweaks brought to the M2 CS is standard Adaptive M suspension with the choice of three driving modes: Comfort, Sport and Sport+. Also included are upgraded M Sport brakes, with 400mm steel discs and six-piston calipers at the front and 380mm steel discs and four-piston calipers at the rear.

Despite the carbonfibre body panels, it's actually no lighter than the Competition unless you opt for the optional carbon ceramics, saving 22kg. This because it includes adaptive M suspension and M Sport seats as standard.

 

Inside, the M2 CS receives a carbonfibre centre console, plus M Sport seats from the M4 CS. Further equipment upgrades include adaptive LED headlights and a Harman Kardon sound system.

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Comments
10

5 November 2019
Only the thiccccest of thicccc boi steering wheels on M cars

*Insert laughing with tears face*

5 November 2019

 That's the assumed increase to get one of these?, worth it?, oh, yes, I think so, no problem shifting these.

5 November 2019
Peter Cavellini wrote:

 That's the assumed increase to get one of these?, worth it?, oh, yes, I think so, no problem shifting these.

It will be interesting to note the price as you say and they won't have any problem shifting it.  

You can get a remap on an M2 competition for about £600 though, then spend say £4k on a titantium Akrapovic exhaust and then still have quite a lot left for really light weight wheels.  Forgetting the carbon frippery the only thing you lose then is lighter roof .

It will be interesting to see how much the wheels and roof save over the competition.

This is probably the best looking BMW currently on sale, and in the flesh does not look too big but does have a nice stance with the flared hips. The M3/M4 can look a bit over bicep'd they are so wide.

5 November 2019
Peter Cavellini wrote:

 That's the assumed increase to get one of these?, worth it?, oh, yes, I think so, no problem shifting these.

The CS version of the previous M3/M4 were around £30k more than the Competition versions. With the M2 Competition being £45k I wouldn't be surprised if the M2 CS is around £60-£65k.

5 November 2019

 Would we say it's all the performance we'll need?, would it cover all the criteria we need from a car?

5 November 2019

There's so much I like about this, the stance, the compactness, the simple interior (steering wheel aside), the colour, the fact its not another SUV...

5 November 2019

One of the very few decent looking BMWs around now.  I could do without the ludicrous 'track focus' bit though.  

6 November 2019
£75k, for what 40hp & some carbon bits? BMW (& those who buy it) have gotta be having a laugh - fools all of you.

6 November 2019

 Of course it's a silly amount of money for a car like this,but, it'll put a smile a mile wide on your face,and that's when £75K seems a bargain!

6 November 2019

... if you compare it with the fully-loaded Megane RS Trophy R at 72 grand, it starts to look like a bargain. Sort of.

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