Refreshed large MPV gains new diesel engine, revised styling and features from elsewhere in the Mercedes range
James Attwood, digital editor
31 January 2019

Mercedes-Benz has updated its V-Class with refreshed exterior and interior styling and a new 2.1-litre four-cylinder diesel engine that produces 236bhp in its highest state of tune.

The large MPV, based on the Vito van, was first launched in 2014 and has now been updated to bring its styling and technology more in line with the rest of the Mercedes range. It will continue to be offered in three different sizes (Standard, Long and Extra Long) and will be followed towards the end of ths year by Marco Polo and Marco Polo Horizon campervan versions.

The previous V-Class’s 2.1-litre diesel engine has been switched for Mercedes' four-cylinder OM654 unit, which will be available in two states of tune. The V250d produces 187bhp and 324lb ft, matching the output of the previous highest spec, while the V300d makes 236bhp and 369lb ft, with the ability to briefly offer an additional 22lb ft in an ‘over-torque’ mode under acceleration. It has a 0-62mph time of 7.9sec and a top speed of 136mph.

Depending on bodystyle, both the V250d and V300d have official fuel economy of between 44.84 and 47.88mpg and emit between 154 and 165g/km of CO2. Mercedes says the V250d offers fuel savings of around 13% over its predecessor. A lower-spec V220d is expected to follow later, matching the entry level offering of the current V-Class.

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Mercedes-Benz V-Class

Mercedes’ van-based MPV offers economical diesel engines and up to eight seats, but it commands a hefty premium compared to its rivals

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The previous seven-speed automatic gearbox has been replaced by a new nine-speed unit, with retuned Comfort and Sport driving modes. Three different chssis versions will be available with differing suspension settings, although all UK cars will get the Agility Control suspension. British buyers will be able to choose from Sport and AMG Line trims, with the latter featuring a bespoke grille design.

Rear-wheel drive is standard, with permanent four-wheel-drive available as an option in Europe, although it will not be offered in the UK. Automatic emergency braking is offered for the first time, alongside other driver aids including blindspot monitoring and lane-keeping assistance.

The revamped interior features a new-look dashboard that includes a standard 10.25-inch touchscreen and air vents inspired by those in the new A-Class. There is also nappa leather upholstery taken from the E-Class and G-Class. It retains a large sliding panoramic roof, a centre console with an integrated toolbox and temperature-controlled cup holders.

The V-Class will be offered with four individual seats in two rows as standard but can be fitted with up to seven seats if two three-wide benches are selected. The second row can be fitted with luxury seats taken from the S-Class that feature back massage and climate control functions.

The V-Class will continue to be built alongside the Vito at Mercedes' plant in Vitoria, Spain. Order books will open in February, with UK deliveries by June. UK prices are yet to be set, but they're expected to cost around £1000 more than the outgoing model, which begin at £51,700 for the V250d version.

Mercedes has sold 209,000 examples of the V-Class since it replaced the Viano in 2014, including 64,000 in 2018 - a year-on-year rise of 7.7%. That was partly due to the model launching in China in 2016 and Hong Kong last year. It has also recently been launched in India.

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Comments
9

31 January 2019

Why is it that when Mercedes puts a new front & updates the interior of a car, as it's just done with the A-class & B-class, it's reported as a complete "new" car. Whereas lesser manufacturer's like Ford Or Vauxhall vehicle refreshes are reported as mere "face-lifts". (Perhaps the average Mercedes buyer is so snob orientated that they can't even tell the difference between Old & New-reworked ?)

31 January 2019
jagdavey wrote:

Why is it that when Mercedes puts a new front & updates the interior of a car, as it's just done with the A-class & B-class, it's reported as a complete "new" car. Whereas lesser manufacturer's like Ford Or Vauxhall vehicle refreshes are reported as mere "face-lifts". (Perhaps the average Mercedes buyer is so snob orientated that they can't even tell the difference between Old & New-reworked ?)

The New A and B class are literally ground up new designs, while the V class is literally a facelift, even in its manufacturer blurb. What’s the issue?

1 February 2019
jagdavey wrote:

Why is it that when Mercedes puts a new front & updates the interior of a car, as it's just done with the A-class & B-class, it's reported as a complete "new" car. Whereas lesser manufacturer's like Ford Or Vauxhall vehicle refreshes are reported as mere "face-lifts". (Perhaps the average Mercedes buyer is so snob orientated that they can't even tell the difference between Old & New-reworked ?)

Similar to Jag buyers then?

31 January 2019

It’s a poshly trimmed and very expensive van, or am I missing something? I’ll probably get to experience one for airport parking transfer one day I suppose. 

2 February 2019
In London,they are everywhere. Outside investment banks, hedge funds and assist managers mainly.

2 February 2019
Asset managers.

31 January 2019

Would still take a Caravelle over one of these. Personal preference.

1 February 2019

I think the points anyone whatever you decide and red ball get dark; all the way up during the entire article are generally restful dazzling, very good employment along with bouncing balls wonderful efforts

1 February 2019
This article is poorly researched. As far as I understand it the OM654 is a 2 litre not a 2.1. Also it states up to 7 seats. 8 seats was the norm in all but the previous 4.8m length van. As far as I understand it, 8 seats are to be offered in all lengths in the new one.The 7 seat Caravalle is missing a trick, it offers no more seating than a Sharan. Having hired a new Custom Tourneo auto recently, I would buy a nearly new one, in preference to a V Class.

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