Mahindra’s successor to the Reva G-Wiz has been withdrawn from sale in the UK just 13 months after it went on sale

The Mahindra e2o, an electric microcar penned as the successor to the Reva G-Wiz, has been withdrawn from sale just 13 months after it was introduced.

Poor sales were the car’s downfall, with the manufacturer blaming Brexit for the slowdown, although could not expand upon why this would hinder sales. It’s also reported that Mahindra is buying back the e2os sold in the UK for their full, original price.

The e2o was launched in April 2016, with the base £12,995 model, as well as the higher-spec TechX model including a touchscreen infotainment system, reversing camera leather seats, alloy wheels and a rapid charging port, priced at £15,995. It could go from 0-50mph in 18sec, with a 13.9kWh battery and 42bhp and 67lb ft of torque. The charge time was nine hours, or 1.5 hours on a fast charge.

Mahindra’s electric cars boss Arvind Mathew said at the car’s launch that UK production was possible if the car was a success: “If the volume goes through the roof, I'd be happy to assemble the car in the UK."

The Indian car conglomerate, which also owns Ssangyong, has fought hard to get a foothold in the UK car market, although the growing Korean SUV brand has been its most successful effort so far. A four-door version of the e2o was going to be introduced, but never made it to market here.

A Mahindra spokesman said: "The Mahindra e2o was launched in the UK in April 2016 and was available to buy directly through online channels, rather than through a traditional dealer network. The pure EV plug-in market has been challenging since the Brexit referendum. 10% import duties and 20% depreciation in Pound Sterling further contributed to lower than anticipated business viability, leading us to re-evaluate the UK as a market for the e2o for now. Mahindra will re-consider the UK market at an opportune time."

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Comments
7

5 May 2017
Poor sales blamed on Brexit? Ha! ha! ha!

5 May 2017
No wonder it was axed due to poor sales. I've never seen one on the roads.

5 May 2017
It's no surprise it's been a dismal failure. I mean, just look at it. It was the worst car on the market, bar none. An embarrassing failure, and entirely predicted by everyone 12 months ago. What's more interesting is why do they want to get the ones they did manage to shift back again? And how many is that, exactly? Brexit, my arse. Monumental misjudgement of what people want, more like.

6 May 2017
steve-p wrote:

It's no surprise it's been a dismal failure. I mean, just look at it. It was the worst car on the market, bar none. An embarrassing failure, and entirely predicted by everyone 12 months ago. What's more interesting is why do they want to get the ones they did manage to shift back again? And how many is that, exactly? Brexit, my arse. Monumental misjudgement of what people want, more like.

As regards buying them back, Mahindra might have calculated that it's cheaper go do this than maintain a servicing and parts supply network for the tiny numbers of cars actually sold in the UK.

5 May 2017
But I wonder if the real reason it didn't sell was insufficient testing around the Nurburgring with all those SUVs that we read about in these pages :)

bol

6 May 2017
If they'd spent a few hundred quid on some market research they could have saved themselves a lot of bother. Anyone could see it was a ridiculous proposition.

7 May 2017
I don't know why they would blame Brexit for poor sales, they just need to take a quick glance at the hideous looking heap of junk and the reason would be glaringly obvious.

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