Currently reading: Future classics: ten affordable used convertible cars set to rise in value
There's a heatwave, so everyone’s after a convertible. Here’s how to beat the summer price hike with cars that’ll only go up in value
Jimi Beckwith
News
4 mins read
2 August 2018

The latest batch of affordable future classics are in, as compiled by Cap HPI black book editor Clive Wilson. 

It’s a convertible special this time around, with appreciating drop-tops set to rise in value. 

The most affordable future classic convertibles

Honda S2000

It’s ever-rumoured for revival by Honda, but while there’s no second-generation S2000, all we have is the original and our rose-tinted spectacles.

And what an original: a high-revving, back-to-basics soft-top with little electronic interference and driving dynamics to put six-figure Italians to shame. 

You can pay as little as £5000 for a used Honda S2000 in the PistonHeads classifieds, although the majority of examples are £10,000 or more.

Read more: Honda S2000 | Used Car Buying Guide

Audi TT 3.2 V6

The original Audi TT is already revered as a design classic. Throw in a 3.2-litre V6 engine and you’ve got a sharply-dressed threat to cars twice its original price. 

Convertibles are less sought-after than coupés and DSG-equipped cars are less sought after than manuals, so there’s potential for a bargain investment once the stick-shift coupés are silly money. 

What’s more, they start from less than £4000 on the PistonHeads classifieds. Grab one while you can. 

Read more: Audi TT | Used Car Buying Guide

Alfa Romeo Spider 3.0 V6

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The Alfa Romeo Spider has rarity on its side, especially in throaty 3.0-litre V6 guise.

Throw in its divisive, typically unique 1990s design and you’ve got a car that will attract grimaces from the uninformed and, soon, big bucks from enthusiasts. 

Prices start at less than £6000 on the PistonHeads classifieds but are already on the rise.

Read more: Used car buying guide: Alfa Romeo Spider

Jaguar XKR

Ford-era Jaguar may now be overshadowed by the brand's success under Tata ownership, but the 1996-2006 XKR is about to pick up value with the best of them. 

Powered by a supercharged 4.0-litre V8, it’s one of the faster, more grand tourer-like cars on the list, but prices don’t match…

…it’s currently available for as little as £8000 on the PistonHeads classifieds, and there’s no shortage of examples to choose from.

Read more: How to get 500bhp for £15,000 - buying guide

Mk3 Mazda MX-5

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Well, we had to mention it, didn't we? The world’s best-selling sports car is an affordable investment, and Cap HPI says the third-generation model is the one to watch.

It could be a slower burn, because there are still numerous examples on the market, but that just means that supply is high and demand well-catered for. Tidier examples are worth the investment so long as they’re kept in good shape. 

£3490 buys you the cheapest on PistonHeads, and there are no less than 132 examples to choose from.

Read more: Used car buying guide: Mk3 Mazda MX-5

Mercedes-Benz SLK 55 AMG

The term ‘pocket rocket’ just doesn’t seem quite strong enough for the teeny-tiny SLK with a 5.4-litre V8 stuffed under its bonnet. 

Mercedes’ maddest AMG car from the mid-2000s can hit 62mph in less than five seconds and harnesses the power of 355 horses. 

It's certainly one with scarcity keeping values high - just three are available in the PistonHeads classifieds, starting from £15,450. Cap HPI says that cheaper examples can scrape to £9000, though.

Read more: Mercedes-Benz SLK | Used Car Buying Guide

Honda CR-X del Sol VTi

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The CR-X de Sol VTi, most sought after with its electric roof, was never a common car. Imports have clouded the market, but UK cars are the most valuable. 

It’s another driver’s Honda, albeit far less powerful than the S2000. 

Good luck finding one, though; while Cap HPI says to budget between £2000 and £8000, there currently aren’t any on PistonHeads. Keep tabs on what’s around for when one does pop up, though.

Read more: Used car buying guide: Honda CR-Z

Toyota MR-2 GT T-Bar

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The second-generation MR2 gained something of a following in modifying circles, meaning clean, unaltered versions are hard to find, especially as the car will round off its third decade since launch next year.

The T-Bar is more sought than the standard coupé, but both are becoming a rare sight on UK roads, so the coupé shouldn’t be disregarded. 

£2700 gets you the cheapest clean T-Bar on PistonHeads, but low-mile examples and collectors’ cars can command far more. 

Read more: Toyota MR2 | Used Car Buying Guide

986 Porsche Boxster

Most can’t afford a collectable, investment Porsche, given that most command scary money to begin with. How does £4000 sound, then? Because that’s how little the 986-generation Boxster can be had for, and values are set to rise. 

Well-looked after examples will cost more, of course, so it’s worth sinking a little more into your investment to avoid tears later, but £12,000 will get you as good an example as you’ll ever find. 

£3500 gets the cheapest Boxster on PistonHeads, and there’s no shortage of examples to suit most budgets. Just get one that has been looked after. 

Read more: Used car buying guide: Porsche Boxster from £3000

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Nissan 350Z and 370Z

Both modern Nissan Z-cars make the grade here, although it’s the one that’s not still on sale that promises the lowest buying cost and the highest potential return. 

The 350Z is yet another Japanese sports car finding increasing appreciation from enthusiasts, forcing up prices. The 3.5-litre V6-engined model starts from around £4000 on the used market. 

PistonHeads has 97 used 350Z and 370Zs among its classifieds, with lower-mileage examples starting at £7500. Read more: Nissan 350Z – the car that helped save Nissan

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Michael Joseph 6 August 2018

future classic of 10 convertible cars to rise in value

agree with Honda S2000....but not sure about others.....

manicm 5 August 2018

None of these cars will

None of these cars will actually appreciate in value. The only one I see doing so is the 1989 Merc SL.
underdog 3 August 2018

Bullet proof Porsches

I have to say that having owned an old Porsche before (944S2 which I bought when it was ten years old) there is a great deal of merit in owning an older Porsche.

First of all Porsche know that their cars are cherished and they do keep parts in production and their dealer network is very welcoming when an old car comes in - at least in my experience anyway. The only thing to watch is that some things do not appear in the service schedule. In the case of the 944S2 it was the timing chains which are v expensive when they go bang so its definitely worth checking the forums to find out about anything like that.

They are generally amazing to drive. They aren't always the prettiest cars, but the purity of the driving experience is always amazing.

They keep their value well and my 944S2 eventually went up in value.

In the 8 years i ran my old 944, it let me down once and that was a five minute fix, the costs of maintenance were reasonable and it was a lovely drive.

I have regreted selling mine and going back to a BMW which is more modern, less reliable and a garbage drive, so as oon as I can its a 987 Cayman for me which I suspect I'll keep for a very long time too.

si73 3 August 2018

underdog wrote:

underdog wrote:

I have to say that having owned an old Porsche before (944S2 which I bought when it was ten years old) there is a great deal of merit in owning an older Porsche.

First of all Porsche know that their cars are cherished and they do keep parts in production and their dealer network is very welcoming when an old car comes in - at least in my experience anyway. The only thing to watch is that some things do not appear in the service schedule. In the case of the 944S2 it was the timing chains which are v expensive when they go bang so its definitely worth checking the forums to find out about anything like that.

They are generally amazing to drive. They aren't always the prettiest cars, but the purity of the driving experience is always amazing.

They keep their value well and my 944S2 eventually went up in value.

In the 8 years i ran my old 944, it let me down once and that was a five minute fix, the costs of maintenance were reasonable and it was a lovely drive.

I have regreted selling mine and going back to a BMW which is more modern, less reliable and a garbage drive, so as oon as I can its a 987 Cayman for me which I suspect I'll keep for a very long time too.

I ran a 924 and agree with your assessment, maintenance was cheaper on the 2.0l 924 as opposed to 924S and 944 which have the proper porsche 2.5l -3.0l engines and the porsche dealer was excellent when mine occasionally popped in. It was very reliable inspite of being 30 yrs old and huge fun to drive.

Also have a soft spot for MGf's, cracking little cars that are massively under-rated.

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