FAAR underpinnings will encourage a gradual shift towards front-wheel drive power for BMW's smaller models
14 March 2018

The next BMW 1 Series is the first of six upcoming models due to switch to new front-wheel drive underpinnings called FAAR (Frontantriebsarchitektur).

Each will come with either two or all-wheel drive. We run through what to expect in the list below.

Click here for our review of the front-wheel-drive BMW 1 Series saloon

1 Series hatchback

The first model to benefit from the new FAAR platform. Insiders indicate that it will again be offered with the choice of three and five-door layouts.

2 Series Gran Turismo

Instead of the China-made front-driven 1 Series saloon, BMW will offer Europe a FAAR-based model that's likely to be a saloon-cum-hatchback.

2 Series Active Tourer

BMW’s first dedicated front-wheel-drive model will switch from its existing UKL platform to the new FAAR architecture in 2021.

2 Series Gran Tourer

The successor to today’s 2 Series Gran Tourer is due in 2021. Plans are for a more luxurious model with improved comfort and space.

iX1

The FAAR platform will play a key role in BMW’s electric car line-up. Pencilled in for 2022 is a junior SUV model conceived as an i3 successor.

X1

Having made the switch from rear-wheel drive to BMW’s UKL platform in 2016, it is no surprise that the next-gen X1 will use the FAAR platform.

More content:

Front-wheel-drive will make the BMW 1 Series better handling

BMW iX3 to introduce brand's fifth-generation EV power in 2020

Our Verdict

BMW 3 Series

The BMW 3 Series' outstanding performance and handling makes it a complete and consummate all-rounder - but then the Jaguar XE and Alfa Romeo Guilia arrived

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Comments
11

14 March 2018

Oh dear, what ever happened to the 'ultimate driving machine'

289

14 March 2018

What a bunch of boring 'same old-same old' cars to look forward to.

No wonder BMW's market share is slipping, they are losing their USP

14 March 2018
The reason for this is that so many 1 & 2 series drivers don't know the current models are RWD and most don't care.

It has always been a badging exercise. Where I live the streets are full of young motorists who think their 116i is a performance and luxury icon because they have never driven anything else.

Yours an ex 120d owner.

14 March 2018

It's the same for 3 series...

 

14 March 2018

I can't believe the Active and Grand Tourers are worth it?

Many customers for small MPVs have moved to Crossovers and small SUVs, and it's such an unaspirational sector of the market, where cars for bought for sensible reasons, which doesn't fit in at all with BMW's brand image?

14 March 2018
Mikey C wrote:

I can't believe the Active and Grand Tourers are worth it?

Many customers for small MPVs have moved to Crossovers and small SUVs, and it's such an unaspirational sector of the market, where cars for bought for sensible reasons, which doesn't fit in at all with BMW's brand image?

A friend of mine has one. She bought it as it was one of the few cars she can lift her wheelchair easily into, and get comfortable in the driving position. In most small SUVs, she couldn't get the chair in on her own

14 March 2018
Mikey C wrote:

I can't believe the Active and Grand Tourers are worth it?

Many customers for small MPVs have moved to Crossovers and small SUVs, and it's such an unaspirational sector of the market, where cars for bought for sensible reasons, which doesn't fit in at all with BMW's brand image?

A friend of mine has one. She bought it as it was one of the few cars she can lift her wheelchair easily into, and get comfortable in the driving position. In most small SUVs, she couldn't get the chair in on her own

26 April 2018
superstevie wrote:
Mikey C wrote:

I can't believe the Active and Grand Tourers are worth it?

Many customers for small MPVs have moved to Crossovers and small SUVs, and it's such an unaspirational sector of the market, where cars for bought for sensible reasons, which doesn't fit in at all with BMW's brand image?

A friend of mine has one. She bought it as it was one of the few cars she can lift her wheelchair easily into, and get comfortable in the driving position. In most small SUVs, she couldn't get the chair in on her own

That is a nice car to drive on 16"rims, it actually had steering feel and was comfortable with lively handling, unlike their 18" leaden feeling exmples (even on adaptive dampers), seems with the transverse engined cars the less you spend the better the car.

26 April 2018
superstevie wrote:
Mikey C wrote:

I can't believe the Active and Grand Tourers are worth it?

Many customers for small MPVs have moved to Crossovers and small SUVs, and it's such an unaspirational sector of the market, where cars for bought for sensible reasons, which doesn't fit in at all with BMW's brand image?

A friend of mine has one. She bought it as it was one of the few cars she can lift her wheelchair easily into, and get comfortable in the driving position. In most small SUVs, she couldn't get the chair in on her own

That is a nice car to drive on 16"rims, it actually had steering feel and was comfortable with lively handling, unlike their 18" leaden feeling exmples (even on adaptive dampers), seems with the transverse engined cars the less you spend the better the car.

14 March 2018

Might as well buy a Skoda

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I'm The Ωmega Man, always talking to myself

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