Plug-in hybrid 3 Series is available in estate form for the first time; 330e can now be specified with xDrive
Felix Page Autocar writer
18 February 2020

BMW has expanded its 3 Series line-up with the addition of a Touring estate version of the plug-in hybrid 330e – a first for the model. 

Available to order from summer, the 330e Touring makes use of the same petrol-electric powertrain as the saloon variant, which pairs a 181bhp 2.0-litre four-cylinder engine with an electric motor integrated into the gearbox. 

The motor produces 67bhp in normal running mode and 111bhp in Sport mode for bursts of up to 10sec, giving the 330e peak combined outputs of 289bhp and 310lb ft. BMW claims this is enough to push the Touring from 0-62mph in 6.1sec – just 0.1sec slower than the saloon – and on to a top speed of 136mph. 

Both versions of the 330e can now be had with four-wheel drive as an alternative to the regular rear-wheel drive. The xDrive models can determine how much power to send to each axle depending on the driving situation. The option reduces the saloon’s 0-62mph time by 0.3sec and the estate’s by 0.1sec while ensuring “maximum traction and driving stability in all road and weather conditions”. 

Our Verdict

BMW 330e

After five years, the current BMW 3 Series gains a plug-in powertrain. We find out if it was worth the wait?

Advertisement
Advertisement

Find an Autocar car review

Driven this week

Like the 330e saloon, the 330e Touring can run on electric power alone at speeds of up to 68mph in hybrid mode or at speeds of up to 87mph when eDrive mode is activated. Its 12kWh lithium ion battery offers an official electric-only range of 34 miles, which is on a par with what the rival Volkswagen Passat GTE can achieve. 

The 330e Touring is officially capable of 176-201mpg – although a figure nearer 50mpg can be expected from real-world use – and CO2 emissions of 32-37g/km. BMW claims a charging time from empty of 3.4 hours from a 7.4kW charger. Regenerative braking is included, sending charge to the battery under deceleration. 

BMW claims the battery, mounted under the boot floor, only marginally diminishes boot space, with the 330e Touring offering 1420 litres of space with the rear seats folded. 

Standard equipment on the 330e Touring includes pre-conditioning functionality, parking assistance, voice control, sat-nav and smartphone compatibility. An optional M Sport package brings adaptive sports suspension, variable steering settings and uprated brakes. 

Prices for the 330e Touring and new xDrive models are yet to be confirmed, but they're likely to command a premium over the current, rear-wheel-drive 330e saloon, which is available from £37,885. 

Read more

BMW 3 Series 330e review​

BMW 3 Series Touring M340i xDrive 2020 review

BMW introduces new mild hybrids in line-up reshuffle​

Join the debate

Comments
7

19 February 2020
I've never understood why four wheel drive has become so popular amougst compact executive buyers when most of us only see snow for a couple of days per year. Why pay the extra, carry the weight and suffer the increased fuel bills? The fact that it becomes harder to have a little rwd fun on corner exit is rubbing salt in the wound.

19 February 2020
@ jameshobiecat think due to other European countries that do see more snow plus US/Canada snow belt mean there’s a market.
AWD does help under certain low grip conditions (greasy roads in winter) but only really a big help when paired with all season/winter tyres in snow.
Used to be an Audi sell but agree everyone pretty much in compact exec seem to be doing it-Jag, Audi, BMW.
More money if people want to pay for it-their choice I guess.

19 February 2020

With cars putting out so much power and torque, over 300 in this car, wheel spin is almost non-existant on greasy junctions etc.  For me I'd rather have 4wd than an Auto box, or panaramic roof, or adaptive cruise control + other bling.  You pays your money... 

19 February 2020

In particular for more poweful cars think this is a better option for safety and comfort,agree rwd for the enthusiast ,but how many more  rwd get wrecked,thinking 911 etc.

19 February 2020

Here we go again with crazy tax / pricing. The estate is expected to start around £40k which means an extra £320 a year in VED. If someone is serious about emissions, then we're going to have to re-examine VED rates. The double whammy of with a price hike coupled with increased VED incentified the higher polluting car. No matter how you look at it, that can be right. 

19 February 2020

Why use a four cylinder engine ? Why dont they properly downsize and use a 3 cylinder ?

19 February 2020
Why not? 4 cylinder is more refined and more powerful. The success of the 330e suggests they are on to something and having test driven one a couple of weeks ago, it’s a fantastic car.

There’s talk of a 320e coming out later this year. That might use the 3 cylinder engine or could just be a detuned 2.0 4 cylinder which I think is more likely.

Add your comment

Log in or register to post comments

Find an Autocar car review

Driven this week