The brand's first diesel in a production model uses triple-charged 4.0-litre V8 engine that produces 429bhp and 664lb ft
Richard Bremner Autocar
21 September 2016

Technical specifications for the 2017 Bentley Bentayga Diesel have been revealed ahead of the model's launch next January.

The Bentayga Diesel is Bentley's first diesel-powered production car, making use of a triple-charged 4.0-litre V8 diesel engine, which has been co-developed with Audi and uses two twin-scroll turbochargers supplemented by an electrically driven supercharger.

Read our full review of the Bentley Bentayga diesel

It develops 429bhp and the same peak torque as the Bentayga’s twin-turbo 6.0-litre petrol W12, although the diesel’s 664lb ft extends from just 1000rpm to 3250rpm.

That’s enough to launch the Bentayga Diesel from 0-62mph in 4.8sec and on to 168mph. According to Bentley’s head of engineering, Rolf Frech, its acceleration from 25mph to 75mph “is much the same as the W12’s, but the W12 gets a second wind at higher speeds”.

Fuel economy for the £135,800 luxury SUV is quoted at 35.8mpg combined and its CO2 emissions are 210g/km.

The Bentayga’s product manager, Peter Guest, said: “We would only do this when it was right. It had to be the right car and the right engine.”

Installing a potentially coarse diesel in a Bentley is a risk, even if this powerplant’s instant low-rev torque provides the stream of effortless thrust required. The brief, said Guest, was to deliver the Bentley driving experience with the trademark combination of performance and luxury, and no compromise in refinement. It also had to be “the fastest diesel SUV in the world”.

Bentley powertrain development boss Paul Williams said the three technologies that have enabled the firm to offer a diesel worthy of the brand are the engine’s triple-charging system, the 48V supplementary electrical system used to power the electric supercharger, and a sophisticated exhaust cleansing system.

The triple-charging system, previously seen in the Audi SQ7, which uses the same engine, provides boost at low revs from the near-instantly reacting supercharger.

This so-called e-booster also primes the first of two twin-scroll turbochargers. This first turbo amplifies midrange thrust, then a second twin-scroll turbo provides extra shove at mid to high revs when the e-booster is dormant.

The effectiveness of the e-booster is heightened by a valve shut-off system, whereby an exhaust valve disengages to provide faster combustion pressure build-up. The exhaust gases are dealt with by using a selective catalytic reduction system, an AdBlue urea fuel supplement and an additional catalyst. Williams said the system is “state of the art and meets all current and future legislation”.

The Bentayga has been acoustically engineered for the V8 diesel from the start and changes to the rest of the car are minor. The exhaust system has been modified — without artificial enhancement — and there are minor tuning changes to the suspension to cater for the weight redistribution caused by the 23-litre AdBlue tank.

The V8 diesel engine itself weighs only 3kg more than the W12. Black radiator mesh, ‘twin quad’ tailpipes and badges identify the Bentayga Diesel.

Technical highlights

E-BOOSTER

Electric supercharger requires 48V to power its 7kW motor, enabling it to spin from idle to 70,000rpm in only 250 milliseconds. The result is maximum torque of 664lb ft from only 1000rpm and superb motorway on-ramp acceleration.

TRIPLE-CHARGER

The electric supercharger (on the bottom right) feeds the cylinders at low revs for near-instant torque. One exhaust valve is closed to intensify the boost, while the exhaust gases prime the second turbo (in the centre). All three chargers feed all eight cylinders and the turbos are twin-scroll.

PACKAGING

Three turbos are located in the vee of the engine and the electric supercharger is remotely mounted. A sliding cam deactivates one exhaust valve when the supercharger operates. The sub-assembly is part of the cooling system.

Our Verdict

Bentley Bentayga

The big-in-every-way Bentley SUV lands. We assess the impact

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Comments
23

21 September 2016
On Monday, parked in front of a 5 star hotel in Sydney. I thought it was a British black cab at first; the resemblance is remarkable

Aussie Rob - a view from down under

21 September 2016
Aussierob wrote:

On Monday, parked in front of a 5 star hotel in Sydney. I thought it was a British black cab at first; the resemblance is remarkable

Hah! Saw one and thought the same, they look like the LTI TX4 "London" style taxis.

At least the Range Rover carries off a certain amount of elegance, this thing is just wrong.

21 September 2016
I see more of these than electric BMWs in London. And loads of F-Paces too

21 September 2016
Why would anyone get one of these when you can get exactly the same car for 70k less in the form of Audi's SQ7! You'd have to have more money than sense! Rich people are so retarded! All they can see is the badge! LOL. Or even better yet, get a Skoda Kodiak and save yourself 110k! Autocar please sort out a roll eyes icon. These forums desperately need one.

21 September 2016
winniethewoo wrote:

Why would anyone get one of these when you can get exactly the same car for 70k less in the form of Audi's SQ7! You'd have to have more money than sense! Rich people are so retarded! All they can see is the badge! LOL. Or even better yet, get a Skoda Kodiak and save yourself 110k! Autocar please sort out a roll eyes icon. These forums desperately need one.

Where this thing is Vulgar, a Q7 just looks like an aggressive bullyboy car, the type of thing some steroid popping gangster in a Guy Richie would drive, and a Skoda Kodak looks like a schoolrun car.

I'd save the money and buy a Range Rover. Or, if I wanted a Bentley, a Flying Spur or Conti GT which are the only good looking cars in their range.

21 September 2016
Great idea.

21 September 2016
A diesel off roader? OK for VW, Skoda etc. but NOT Bentley.

How the brand has fallen.

The worlds fastest trucks.

Utterly vulgar.

21 September 2016
Considering the Q7 3.0D is supposed to do $7mpg, but struggles to do 30 in the real world, expect this barge to struggle to mid 20's, so you have to ask two questions,1. Is the sacrifice of buying a diesel in a Bentley really worth it, and 2. When you are forking out £160k+ are you really worried about MPG figures in the first place to have to warrant buying a diesel? I genuinely dont see the need, and I suspect very few owners will either.

21 September 2016
Citytiger wrote:

Considering the Q7 3.0D is supposed to do $7mpg, but struggles to do 30 in the real world, expect this barge to struggle to mid 20's, so you have to ask two questions,1. Is the sacrifice of buying a diesel in a Bentley really worth it, and 2. When you are forking out £160k+ are you really worried about MPG figures in the first place to have to warrant buying a diesel? I genuinely dont see the need, and I suspect very few owners will either.

Seeing as most Merc S class', Jag XJs, Audi Q7s, BMW 7 Series, Range Rover and just about every other circa £100k or more car I see in the City is a diesel I suspect a diesel Bentley will sell very well.

 

21 September 2016
Citytiger wrote:

Considering the Q7 3.0D is supposed to do $7mpg, but struggles to do 30 in the real world, expect this barge to struggle to mid 20's, so you have to ask two questions,1. Is the sacrifice of buying a diesel in a Bentley really worth it, and 2. When you are forking out £160k+ are you really worried about MPG figures in the first place to have to warrant buying a diesel? I genuinely dont see the need, and I suspect very few owners will either.

If we assume your figure of mid 20's mpg for the diesel Bentayga are correct for real world driving and it is well known that the W12 Bentley Continental only achieves 15 mpg surely the resulting huge saving in fuel costs and the far greater range of the diesel will be attractive to buyers.
Or is it that as I suspect you just want to criticise any vehicle fitted with a Diesel engine? I have yet to see any USA You Tube review of the diesel Range Rover that does not praise the real world driving experience of the diesel against the V6 petrol version for a mere $1500 extra plus 25 to 30 mpg US gallons. Also could you explain what you mean when you say "is the sacrifice of buying a diesel in a Bentley really worth it" what sacrifice?

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