Audi's seven-seat SUV will be updated in line with newer models such as the Q8 and A6
20 December 2018

Audi is readying for another bumper year of new car launches and the latest addition spotted is a mid-life refresh for the Q7 SUV.

The Volvo XC90 rival has been on sale since 2015 and an updated version will arrive not long after the A4 facelift in June 2019. New spyshots show the seven-seater in light disguise undergoing cold weather testing.

The images reveal that the Q7's exterior design will be brought into line with Audi's latest large models, including the A6, A7, A8 and Q8. As such, it's possible to see a new front fascia with a wider grille, larger lower intakes and reprofiled LED headlights. At the rear, it adopts new tail-lights inspired by the E-tron electric SUV, but it doesn't appear to feature that car's full-width light bar.

Major changes are expected inside. The Q7 currently features one of Audi's older interior designs, with a free-standing infotainment screen and button-heavy layout. Audi is rumoured to be investing heavily to transplant its new-style dashboard, with its minimalist look and dual-screen infotainment system - necessary to extend the Q7's life into early next decade.

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Powertrain changes will include the adoption of 48V mild-hybrid tech across most variants, increasing efficiency. It's not clear yet whether the diesel-electric Q7 E-tron plug-in hybrid will make a return after going off sale due to WLTP emissions testing delays and the same goes for the SQ7. Intel coming out of Germany suggests Audi might switch to a six-cylinder petrol powertrain to bring it into line with the SQ5

Read more:

Audi Q7 review (2018)

Audi preparing bigger A4 and A4 Avant facelift for 2020

Audi Q8 review

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Comments
11

20 December 2018

I am an Audi fan since I had the first ever Quattro way back in the days of yore and the then wifey had the same design Coupe CC with the delightful 5 cyl engine. 

However, several business friends here have all felt short changed by the current model, and indeed a know of one which was taken back by Audi and replaced FOC because it had spent more time off than on the road. It was all related to the DSG box. 

So hopefully they have sorted it, because I really like this car much more than Merc, Toyota and RR not to mention plastic BMW's

what's life without imagination

21 December 2018

are you willing to review a free portable cordless tyre inflator

if yes, please contact me

20 December 2018

In the grander scheme of things I'm not sure it'd be a massive investment in transplanting Audi's current interior dash and design theme to the facelifted Q7. As the Q8 is the coupe version of the Q7, I suspect all that would be needed is for the refreshed Q7 to simply adopt the same dashboard. And it'd also end the need for 2 different dashboards for what are essentially the same cars.

20 December 2018

Just try getting 7 people seated in the Q8, then there's the price difference with the Q7 starting some £14k less than the Q8

typos1 - Just can’t respect opinion

21 December 2018
xxxx wrote:

Just try getting 7 people seated in the Q8, then there's the price difference with the Q7 starting some £14k less than the Q8

My point is that the Q8 is a coupe version of the Q7 and are therefore essentially the same cars underneath. In the same way the Audi A5 is to the A4 or a BMW 4 Series is to a 3 Series. As with all coupes, the Q8 is of course more expensive and less practical than its more conventional sibling.

20 December 2018

My wife has a current Q7. I'd MUCH rather have its "older" interior -- with its MMI controller, knobs and buttons -- than the newer touchscreen. Touchscreens in cars are just STUPID. Bottons and knobs can be used without looking away from the road. Touchscreens, in stark contrast, require the driver to look at the screen rather than the road, which is dangerous. Yes, I've had cars with touchscreens, so I'm all too familiar with them. How could looking at the screen rather than looking at the road be a good idea???

20 December 2018
Speedraser wrote:

My wife has a current Q7. I'd MUCH rather have its "older" interior -- with its MMI controller, knobs and buttons -- than the newer touchscreen. Touchscreens in cars are just STUPID. Bottons and knobs can be used without looking away from the road. Touchscreens, in stark contrast, require the driver to look at the screen rather than the road, which is dangerous. Yes, I've had cars with touchscreens, so I'm all too familiar with them. How could looking at the screen rather than looking at the road be a good idea???

 

Quite right Speedraser.

It's a simple enough point that you make, but it is just so true, and it makes you wonder what on earth the interior designers are being asked to achieve if safety is not their paramount design priority. Luxury feel, good looks, cost control and pricing and all the rest of it are obviously very important but unless the car is as safe as it reasonably can be, it is a bad design.

Having said that, the car itself looks slightly sleeker somehow, and better for it. Are the dimensions identical? Is it an illusion created by the masking maybe?

20 December 2018

imho touching a screen while driving isn’t much different from texting on a phone and, therefore is probably illegal. It’s a significantly worse problem in right hand drive cars (all the civilised countries) because you are required to use your non dominant hand (unless you’re left handed) and so greater concentration and distraction are required.

Time to stop this nonsense. Probably the greatest reason I’ll never own a Tesla...

Robbo

Aussie Rob - a view from down under

21 December 2018

In today's technology age touchscreens are suppose to impart a sense of coolness in their looks and operations and in addition to being deemed as advanced and a step ahead of 'analogue' controls, some car manufacturers see touchscreens as features to make their products appear more premium, superior and more advanced. Yes, touchscreens do look great and they work very well on a phone or tablet but in a car, it's a nightmare to use and also dangerous at times too. My car has touchscreens for many controls and it's a pain in the arse and far from instinctive to use either.

21 December 2018

...going through the options list it all works well enough.

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