Production of Polestar’s Tesla Model 3 rival, which promises a 311-mile range, has started in China, ahead of deliveries this summer
24 March 2020

Production of Polestar's second production model, the 2, has begun in Luqiao, China ahead of first deliveries in summer. 

Priced from £49,900, the 2 is the more attainable sibling of the far pricier Polestar 1, the genesis of the electric performance brand that has been separated from Volvo. Following its European arrival, it will go on sale in China and North America.

The Luqiao plant, south of Shanghai, is owned by Geely and operated by Volvo and already builds XC40s for the Chinese market as well as the Lynk & Co 01, all of which sit on Volvo’s Compact Modular Architecture (CMA) platform. The Polestar 2 is the first electric vehicle to be built at the facility.

The new model, described as the “first electric car to compete in the marketplace around the Tesla Model 3”, is a five-door fastback that takes design inspiration from Volvo models such as the S90. It was first displayed at last year's Geneva motor show and subsequently at the Goodwood Festival of Speed.

Polestar will sell models online only. UK reservations are being taken on its website, with a £1000 fully refundable deposit. Firm orders can be placed now, with first deliveries expected in July. The £49,900 on-the-road price includes routine servicing and maintenance for three years, plus VAT. 

The first 12 months of production will be dedicated to a fully loaded launch edition. Polestar had previously indicated a cost of around £51,000 for that model and suggested subsequent base models would have a "guide price" of around £34,500, similar to the Model 3.

It has two electric motors, mounted across both axles for four-wheel drive, and a 27-module, 78kWh battery pack integrated into the floor. Polestar claimed the pack contributes to chassis rigidity and helps reduce road noise by 3.7dB compared with a traditional chassis. 

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The powertrain produces 402bhp and 487lb ft of torque, translating to a 0-62mph time of “less than five seconds”. It’s not clear yet if cheaper variants will receive a detuned version. The range "target" is quoted at 311 miles on the new, tougher WLTP cycle – a figure highly competitive alongside the Model 3 and Jaguar I-Pace.

The interior also takes inspiration from current Volvo models, but it features bespoke technology, including a new Android-powered infotainment system. One of the first cars on sale with this operating system, the 2's Android set-up “provides a solid and adaptable digital environment for apps and vehicle functions to coexist”, according to Polestar.

It brings with it a suite of Google services, including the Google Assistant, Google Maps with EV-specific features and the Google Play Store, all controlled via a new 11.0in touchscreen. Further tech, such as numerous connected services and the facility to use your smartphone as a car key, also features. As with Volvo's models, safety features such as Pilot Assist semi-autonomous driving, LED matrix adaptive high-beam lights and automatic emergency braking are available.

The 2 also follows the latest trend by having as standard a vegan interior, which, according to head of design Maximilian Missoni, has “progressive textiles that will appeal to the forward-thinking audience who will subscribe to Polestar 2”. 

Read more

First Polestar 1 prototypes seen ahead of summer deliveries

Safe in their hands: talking to Volvo's design team

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Comments
42

27 February 2019

About as likely as Vovlo's claim "No one will be killed in New Volvo by 2020", remember that. Other than that it's good to hear 'mainstream' manufacturers highlighting Tesla as something to target, unheard of just 5 years ago.

28 February 2019

I know why this looks so much better than a Tesla.

It has a grill. One of Teslas biggest mistakes, I think.

Apart from that, I think that rear end looks lovely

3 October 2019
JMax18 wrote:

I know why this looks so much better than a Tesla.

It has a grill. One of Teslas biggest mistakes, I think.

Apart from that, I think that rear end looks lovely

dont see why an electric car needs to have a grill its nearly as bad fake exausts.

but i still do like this polestar.

3 October 2019
JMax18 wrote:

I know why this looks so much better than a Tesla.

It has a grill. One of Teslas biggest mistakes, I think.

Apart from that, I think that rear end looks lovely

It does look quite distinctive whilst keeping the Volvo looks. Volvo drivers will be happy to move over if wanting to stick with the brand.

 

27 February 2019

Knock 200 off the BHP and add 200 to the range.

27 February 2019
Leslie Brook wrote:

Knock 200 off the BHP and add 200 to the range.

That's not how EVs work. Bigger battery = more range *and* more power. There's not the trade-off that you get in combustion engines.

27 February 2019
Vertigo wrote:
Leslie Brook wrote:

Knock 200 off the BHP and add 200 to the range.

That's not how EVs work. Bigger battery = more range *and* more power. There's not the trade-off that you get in combustion engines.

No, a bigger battery would give more range if the same motors were drawing the same current. If you had a motor or in this case motors with a combined power of 200hp they would draw less current at maximum effort than a motor capable of 400hp. The battery is the equivalent of the fuel tank, more battery = more fuel = greater range. 

27 February 2019
Leslie Brook wrote:

Vertigo wrote:
Leslie Brook wrote:

Knock 200 off the BHP and add 200 to the range.

That's not how EVs work. Bigger battery = more range *and* more power. There's not the trade-off that you get in combustion engines.

No, a bigger battery would give more range if the same motors were drawing the same current. If you had a motor or in this case motors with a combined power of 200hp they would draw less current at maximum effort than a motor capable of 400hp. The battery is the equivalent of the fuel tank, more battery = more fuel = greater range. 

The key word there was "at maximum effort". You can't drive with your foot permanently to the floor anywhere except Nardo.

When you're not using that extra power - in other words, ~99% of the driving time on public roads - all electric powertrains consume a similar amount of energy, whether they're rated for a thousand horsepower or a hundred. On the EPA test cycle, a 480bhp Tesla Model 3 Performance consumes 291 watt-hours per mile, and a 148bhp Nissan Leaf consumes 301 watt-hours per mile.

So the only way the Polestar 2 is going another 200 miles is if they manage to fit a 60% bigger battery pack. (More than that, in reality, because the extra weight will increase the energy consumption.)

3 October 2019
Vertigo wrote:

Leslie Brook wrote:

Vertigo wrote:
Leslie Brook wrote:

Knock 200 off the BHP and add 200 to the range.

That's not how EVs work. Bigger battery = more range *and* more power. There's not the trade-off that you get in combustion engines.

No, a bigger battery would give more range if the same motors were drawing the same current. If you had a motor or in this case motors with a combined power of 200hp they would draw less current at maximum effort than a motor capable of 400hp. The battery is the equivalent of the fuel tank, more battery = more fuel = greater range. 

The key word there was "at maximum effort". You can't drive with your foot permanently to the floor anywhere except Nardo.

When you're not using that extra power - in other words, ~99% of the driving time on public roads - all electric powertrains consume a similar amount of energy, whether they're rated for a thousand horsepower or a hundred. On the EPA test cycle, a 480bhp Tesla Model 3 Performance consumes 291 watt-hours per mile, and a 148bhp Nissan Leaf consumes 301 watt-hours per mile.

So the only way the Polestar 2 is going another 200 miles is if they manage to fit a 60% bigger battery pack. (More than that, in reality, because the extra weight will increase the energy consumption.)

There's no point correcting people who are perfectly happy believing in, and circulating, drivel.

27 February 2019
I was like "wait... what? How?" throughout the article until getting to: "the first twelve months of production will be dedicated to a fully-loaded launch edition, priced at €59,900 (around £51,000)."

That means the launch car has very similar specs and price to the Long-range Model 3, so presumably when the sub-£35k model arrives, it won't have the 300-mile range or 400bhp.

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