Currently reading: 2020 Skoda Superb iV: plug-in hybrid pricing announced
Skoda's first electrified model will arrive on UK shores in January, priced from £31,970
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3 mins read
24 September 2019

Skoda has announced that its new Superb iV plug-in hybrid will be priced from £31,970 when it arrives in Britain in January.

The figure was revealed to journalists during the UK launch of the rest of the revised Superb range and makes the new model £4730 cheaper than its sibling, the new Volkswagen Passat GTE.

The plug-in hybrid is named the Superb iV in recognition of Skoda’s new sub-brand that will be used for its bold electrification plans

The Superb iV features a 154bhp turbocharged 1.4-litre petrol engine and a 114bhp electric motor, with power sent to the front wheels through a six-speed dual-clutch automatic gearbox. The peak system outputs are 215bhp and 295lb ft of torque. .

The model is officially capable of completing 34 miles of electric-only running – identical to the Passat GTE. Skoda has yet to release performance figures, but insiders suggest they will closely match those of the Passat GTE, hinting at a 0-62mph time of around 7.4sec. The Czech brand also promises an official CO2 emissions rating of less than 40g/km. 

A battery pack is located under the floor and ahead of the rear axle, which means a slight reduction in boot capacity – 485 litres for the hatchback and 510 litres for the estate, compared with 625 litres and 660 litres for petrol and diesel variants.

Beyond the well-hidden charging port integrated into the front grille, there will be little to give away the Superb iV's part-electric status. The infotainment system can display information on battery status and electric range and additional controls for the various powertrain modes. It will also be possible to programme the PHEV's air-con to cool the cabin before the car is needed.  

Prices for the rest of the range, with traditional petrol and diesel engines, start from £24,655 for the hatchback and £25,975 for the estate.

The updated Superb has been launched with a choice of two petrol and two diesel engines and in six trim levels. Entry-level S models, offered with a 1.6-litre petrol or diesel engine, feature LED front and rear lights and a new infotainment system featuring voice control. 

SE trim adds features including 17in alloy wheels, dual-zone climate control, parking sensors and adaptive cruise control. Above that, SE Technology features leather upholstery, heated seats and integrated wi-fi. SE L includes 18in alloy wheels, rear privacy glass, full matrix LED headlights and an electrically operated boot.

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Sportline Plus trim comes with 19in alloy wheels and black sports styling details, along with Alcantara upholstery and a three-spoke sport steering wheel. The range-topping Laurin & Klement spec features all of the kit from SE L and adds 18in alloy wheels, ventilated front seats, heated front and reat seats, LED interior lighting, three-zone climate control, an upgraded navigation system and a Canton sound system, along with Skoda's Dynamic Chassis Control system.

The existing Superb powertrains will be carried over for the facelifted model, with a new 190bhp 2.0-litre turbo petrol unit added. The range-topper will be a 268bhp 2.0-litre turbo petrol - down around 8bhp from the outgoing on car due to the inclusion of a petrol paticulate filter and other emissions control systems.

The redesigned Superb has gained a new-look grille, with added chrome trim between the LED rear lights. There is also a new front bumper, which stretches the length of the car by 8mm to 4869mm.

The car is the first Skoda to gain full LED matrix headlights as an option, and new driver assistance features include predictive cruise control that makes use of data from road signs. 

Deliveries for the facelifted car begin in September. Skoda expects the plug-in hybrid will be highly competitive in its increasingly crowded part of the market, taking up to 20% of sales in the UK.  

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xxxx 25 September 2019

£32k v £25k

So is that £7.3k extra for the Plug-in version, hard to work out from article. Yes you get a get a faster car but for the private buyer is it more economical? I think not.  As a tax dodge you can make a case, for now.

Rollocks 25 June 2019

Working class workhorse? Not any more....

These are ludicrously high prices for a non-premium mid-sized car, and another kick in the teeth for ordinary families who need a reasonably spacious mainstream saloon without taking out a second mortgage. Assuming they don't want to shoehorn themselves into a small Focus-sized vehicle, what 'value' options are left?
Zeddy 25 June 2019

Rollocks wrote:

Rollocks wrote:

These are ludicrously high prices for a non-premium mid-sized car, and another kick in the teeth for ordinary families who need a reasonably spacious mainstream saloon without taking out a second mortgage. Assuming they don't want to shoehorn themselves into a small Focus-sized vehicle, what 'value' options are left?

 

People have become inured to pcp/lease deals and if the manufacturers' finance deals include anything between 4-7k as a deposit contribution as they very often do, all people see is the monthly payment.

Manufacturers have been "launching" their prices for quite a few years now.

xxxx 25 June 2019

£25k and 1.6 engine ???

The new C class starts at £29k with a fair bit of tech, the 2nd level Superb (17 inch wheel etc) will probably be around £26.5k which is just to close for comfort.

As to a 1.6 petrol. where's that from?

00se7en 25 June 2019

These things are huge

xxxx wrote:

The new C class starts at £29k with a fair bit of tech, the 2nd level Superb (17 inch wheel etc) will probably be around £26.5k which is just to close for comfort.

As to a 1.6 petrol. where's that from?

Superb is way bigger than a C Class, it's really pitched as a value E Class or Audi A6, and there the price comparison works better.  There's not a lot you can buy for <£30k with that kind of rear leg room or boot space.

You'd only really buy a Superb if you needed the space though.

At the top end of the ranges though, it is now possible to sink serious money into a Skoda, which wouldn't be a wise investment.  They do seem to be competing with Volvo for the 'sensible' middle class buyers.  With options it's easy to spec a £26k Skoda Scala, which is just crazy.

A year-old Octavia SE Technology Estate for <£15k is all the family car most people need though, and still looks good value.  Let's hope the next-gen Octavia doesn't go too far upmarket.

xxxx 25 June 2019

180mm bigger

00se7en wrote:

xxxx wrote:

The new C class starts at £29k with a fair bit of tech, the 2nd level Superb (17 inch wheel etc) will probably be around £26.5k which is just to close for comfort.

As to a 1.6 petrol. where's that from?

Superb is way bigger than a C Class, it's really pitched as a value E Class or Audi A6, and there the price comparison works better.  There's not a lot you can buy for <£30k with that kind of rear leg room or boot space.

You'd only really buy a Superb if you needed the space though.

At the top end of the ranges though, it is now possible to sink serious money into a Skoda, which wouldn't be a wise investment.  They do seem to be competing with Volvo for the 'sensible' middle class buyers.  With options it's easy to spec a £26k Skoda Scala, which is just crazy.

A year-old Octavia SE Technology Estate for <£15k is all the family car most people need though, and still looks good value.  Let's hope the next-gen Octavia doesn't go too far upmarket.

I suppose it's a fair chunk but not sure about the 'way bigger' bearing in mind they're considered mid-large size cars in the first place, and, most of that space COULD be 'lost' for in 2 bumpers and boot.

Zeddy 25 June 2019

xxxx wrote:

xxxx wrote:

I suppose it's a fair chunk but not sure about the 'way bigger' bearing in mind they're considered mid-large size cars in the first place, and, most of that space COULD be 'lost' for in 2 bumpers and boot.

You need to go look at the rear space in a Superb and then a C-Class to see why they are not competing against each other.

Anyway, what person considering a Mercedes would even think of a Skoda?

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