Volkswagen has released new pictures of its first electric-only model ahead of its full reveal at the Paris motor show next week
Jimi Beckwith
23 September 2016

Volkswagen has shown its upcoming electric model in a series of revealing sketches ahead of its debut at the Paris motor show.

The Volkswagen electric concept has now been revealed. Click here to see it.

The EV, which will be revealed next week, is a five-door hatchback with sliding rear passenger doors.

The images confirm it gets futuristic lighting and a rear roofline that extends out beyond the tailgate. With no combustion engine to feed, the car's nose is short and has no grille.

The model, which has been scheduled for release in 2019, will be capable of travelling between 250 and 300 miles on a single charge, according to VW Group CEO Matthias Müller, with charging only taking 15 minutes.

The man in charge of the project, Christian Senger, said a range of 250 miles is adequate for everyday use. The car will also use a conventional mainly steel body. "Construction will be the same as today," said Senger. "There won’t be any radical body concepts."

The EV will be a similar size to the brand's Golf hatchback, but the benefits of the packaging of electric vehicles mean that interior space is set to rival that of the larger Passat.

We know that the car will be packed with technology, including a 24-hour internet connection and a continuous link to a Volkswagen app store. A 'Volkswagen ID' will be specific to every driver, with their preferences and settings saved and applied to other cars, such as hire cars, that the driver may use. 

The model will be the second of five electric Volkswagen electric vehicles, all developed as the brand looks to move away from fossil fuels following the Dieselgate emissions scandal. The follow-up models to the hatchback will be a crossover, a luxury saloon and a sports car. An MPV will come before the hatchback and will most likely be a production version of the Budd-e concept. 

Volkswagen's target is to be selling one million fully electric vehicles by 2025. 

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Comments
12

16 September 2016
and VW aren't to hot on the truth at the moment and it comes in at around £4,000 more than a conventional Golf with matching performance then surely it will be a watershed moment for the ICE

 

Hydrogen cars just went POP

16 September 2016
I think the comment about a 250 mile range with recharging in 15 minutes needs explanation. These figures imply a battery capacity of around 60 kWhr (twice that of a Nissan Leaf) plus a charging power requirement of around 240kW. I don't know whether such chargers exist, let alone the infrastructure to supply them. And presumably with such high charge currents involved, some kind of battery cooling would also be needed. It's all very well having ambitious targets, but delivering them will not be easy.

16 September 2016
@LP VAG are referring to the next generation CCS standards which allow charging at 350Kw. All of their press releases 'assume' that this will be available (also see Audi, Porsche etc).

So, as I've said elsewhere many of VAGs claims for EV are just natural expected evolution for all manufacturers over the next few years.

At the moment it feels like a lot of hot air. We're talking about a car which won't be available for 3 years, by which time cars like the Model 3 and Ampera-e will probably be a common sight on the roads. I can't help thinking this is all a PR stunt by a firm trying desperately to prove they didn't guess the future incorrectly.

17 September 2016
Electric vehicles will only become popular once range improves to enable the occasional long-distance journey.

Who would be stupid enough to believe VW's claim of a 250-300 mile range on this car? I bet driving with the radio on will mean a range of 100 or so like all the other electric cars' real range. Heaven forbid you need to drive with heating or air con running!

Paul Brighton.

18 September 2016
Thumper wrote:

Electric vehicles will only become popular once range improves to enable the occasional long-distance journey.

Who would be stupid enough to believe VW's claim of a 250-300 mile range on this car? I bet driving with the radio on will mean a range of 100 or so like all the other electric cars' real range. Heaven forbid you need to drive with heating or air con running!

And everything with a rechargeable battery, from 'phones to shavers to laptops, quickly deteriorates, even from the limited life it initially has, which is almost always less than claimed. My iPod Touch is 21 months old and with the screen lit up I'm lucky to get three hours of continuous play, compared to between ten and twelve under the same conditions when it was new. Electric cars are going nowhere.

I don't need to put my name here, it's on the left

 

23 September 2016

"I bet driving with the radio on will mean a range of 100 or so like all the other electric cars' real range."

Physics isn't your strong point is it...

18 September 2016
Any car that has to be plugged in to the mains is an automatic fail. The car is about mobility and freedom of movement. If one cannot run out of fuel on a deserted country road, miles from anywhere and simply get a container out of the boot and be on the move again in a couple of minutes it isn't a car.

I've often said before that petrol hybrids which recover braking energy, or maybe even have a solar panel, supplementing the petrol engine to boost power for short term performance or limit emissions in congestion, may have some future, but that's it. Electric cars are going nowhere.

I don't need to put my name here, it's on the left

 

23 September 2016
bowsersheepdog wrote:

Any car that has to be plugged in to the mains is an automatic fail. The car is about mobility and freedom of movement. If one cannot run out of fuel on a deserted country road, miles from anywhere and simply get a container out of the boot and be on the move again in a couple of minutes it isn't a car.

I've often said before that petrol hybrids which recover braking energy, or maybe even have a solar panel, supplementing the petrol engine to boost power for short term performance or limit emissions in congestion, may have some future, but that's it. Electric cars are going nowhere.

"simply get a container out of the boot and be on the move again in a couple of minutes it isn't a car" I've never run out of petrol and 99% of people don't carry a can of petrol around. Besides you'd have to be a complete donkey to run out fuel or electricity. EV cars are here to stay at what point will you stop saying "Electric cars are going nowhere" and admit you're wrong. Bear in mind in 1 in 4 new cars are electric in Norway. ps the "at what point ..." was a serious question can you give your answer as sales percentage which you deem EV's to be a success afterall

 

Hydrogen cars just went POP

23 September 2016
Out of the readers here, who actually carries a jerry can in the boot of their car still, or knows anyone else who does for that matter? Fuel gauges aren't exactly unreliable, most cars have trip computers now, so how on earth would you manage to stretch the range so far you'd run out of petrol?

23 September 2016
Out of the readers here, who actually carries a jerry can in the boot of their car still, or knows anyone else who does for that matter? Fuel gauges aren't exactly unreliable, most cars have trip computers now, so how on earth would you manage to stretch the range so far you'd run out of petrol?

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