Currently reading: Renault loses top safety rating after Euro NCAP tests
French firm's safety rating is downgraded as hatch is docked a star for inadequate seatbelt warning
News
2 mins read
1 July 2014

Renault’s Mégane hatchback has been marked down to just three stars in the latest Euro NCAP crash test results because “the text informing the driver of the status of the rear seatbelts was not available in all languages”.

Euro NCAP admitted that this minor issue was enough to lose the Mégane a whole star, despite the car scoring 83 per cent for adult occupant protection. Renault is said to be addressing the issue “very soon”, which means a retest is likely in the next few months.

The move has highlighted the increasing importance placed by the Euro NCAP crash tests on such small details as well as on various new types of electronic assistance, such as speed limitation devices.

However, there is increasing evidence of friction between Euro NCAP and some car makers. Michiel van Ratingen, Euro NCAP secretary general, recently criticised quadricycles such as the Renault Twizy and Ligier IXO.

“It’s worrying to find that, because crash safety tests are not required by law, quadricycles show a level of safety that is way below that of cars,” he said. “Even though they meet legislative standards, these vehicles lack the minimum safety equipment which has become commonplace on passenger cars sold in Europe.”

Renault exchanged public words of disagreement with NCAP in 2012 when the safety of the original Dacia Duster was criticised. “It is disappointing that a mother company like Renault does not give safety the same priority in Dacia cars as it does in cars sold under its own brand,” Euro NCAP said at the time. 

Dacia sources recently told Autocar that it believed the safety of its cars’ structures were at “a very high level” and that was the most important safety issue.

Insiders say Euro NCAP wants to see all car makers adopting a plan for all future cars to be fitted with increasingly sophisticated safety equipment such as auto city braking. However, the popularity of budget cars such as those made by Dacia could undermine this move as consumers become reluctant to pay extra for such features.

The MG3 also scored three stars, while the VW Golf SV received top marks.

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ScruffsMD 2 July 2014

Was once a 5* car!

Just shows how effective NCAP have been at pushing up safety standards - this was once a high scoring 5* car....
Dark Isle 2 July 2014

Hmm

ScruffsMD wrote:

Just shows how effective NCAP have been at pushing up safety standards - this was once a high scoring 5* car....

Renault obviously haven't compromised the safety of one of the biggest selling models. EuroNCAP have moved the goalposts to emphasise electric safety aids (in EVERY language!), instead.

Dark Isle 2 July 2014

Misleading Ratings

The one-star rating system is at best confusing and at worst deceptive. The vast majority of people think the star rating advertised is just for crash protection. They need to know the structural safety rating of the car, and have it distinct from the assistance rating (which verges on the ridiculous with so many points being allocated off for language provision). The whole system needs overhauling; it's a mess.
winniethewoo 2 July 2014

@Phinehas

It isn't a Crash Test. Crash testing is only part of the picture about overall safety in an accident.

If EuroNcap didn't include electronic systems (which are proven to prevent accidents, make inevitable accidents less severe and save lives) in its overall score, the manufacturers would NOT fit them as standard. There wouldn't be as much innovation in the safety field either.

If Renault wasn't called up by Euroncap about the rear seatbelt warning, would they have fixed this issue of their own accord? Hell no. Pity the guy who forgets to buckle up in the rear and has a crash in a current non compliant car.

You also make the error of assuming people know what these systems are and what they do. I would assume that because you do, you are in a knowledgeable minority.

dukebox9reg 2 July 2014

winniethewoo wrote:It isn't a

winniethewoo wrote:

It isn't a Crash Test. Crash testing is only part of the picture about overall safety in an accident.

If EuroNcap didn't include electronic systems (which are proven to prevent accidents, make inevitable accidents less severe and save lives) in its overall score, the manufacturers would NOT fit them as standard. There wouldn't be as much innovation in the safety field either.

If Renault wasn't called up by Euroncap about the rear seatbelt warning, would they have fixed this issue of their own accord? Hell no. Pity the guy who forgets to buckle up in the rear and has a crash in a current non compliant car.

You also make the error of assuming people know what these systems are and what they do. I would assume that because you do, you are in a knowledgeable minority.

No sympathy for people who dont belt up, 1st thing you do when you get into the car and illegal if you don't wear it.

May as well give constant warning about not using your mobile at the wheel or don't drink drive.

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