More stringent testing regime, which replaces the NEDC this year, also decreases the hot city car's official fuel economy from 49mpg to 42mpg

The official CO2 emissions figure of the new Volkswagen Up GTI has been raised from 110g/km to 127-129g/km after testing on the new Worldwide Harmonised Light Vehicles Test Procedure (WLTP).

The first Volkswagen model to be tested in this new format, which replaces the New European Driving Cycle (NEDC), has also had its quoted combined economy reduced from 49mpg to 42mpg as a result.

Both changes equate to about 15% reductions in efficiency, revealing the impact the new, more stringent real-world tests can have compared with the lab-based NEDC test, which had not been revised since 1997.

The WLTP regime includes higher driving speeds than NEDC and harder acceleration and deceleration. It also tests cars with and without optional equipment to offer a best and worst-case scenario, hence the CO2 range published for the Up GTI.

Both NEDC and WLTP figures will continue to be produced until September 2018, after which only WLTP figures will be shown to customers.

The changes to the Up GTI’s official figures were revealed with confirmation that the model is now available to order in Germany, with prices there starting at €16,975 (£15,010 at current rates).

The range-topping variant of the Up city car produces 114bhp from its turbocharged 1.0-litre three-cylinder engine, enabling a 0-62mph time of 8.8sec.

It will arrive in Britain from February 2018 as a rival to the Fiat 500 Abarth and Vauxhall Adam S.

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Comments
11

5 December 2017

Sam, I suspect that VW has not been fully accurate with you on this.

Most likely the new figures are 'Correlated NEDC', which is an interim step between NEDC and WLTP.  Not WLTP yet.

Worth (double) checking

5 December 2017

Is it really? It’s still done in the lab so I expect they’re just tagging ‘real world’ onto it to satisfy the fan boys whose favorite car doesn’t do well. There’ll never be ‘real world’ figures for more reasons than I care to mention so the term should be forgotten about.

Basically just take whatever figure is given take off 15% then accept all a long it’s just a COMPARASION tool and differences between cars will vary no more than a few percent which will amount to £100 a year on your £24,000 purchase

 

Hydrogen cars just went POP

5 December 2017

OMG, a post from XXXX in which I agree with every single word !!

5 December 2017

It's because I'm usually right! lol (whatever that means)

 

Hydrogen cars just went POP

5 December 2017

The NEDC tests were deeply flawed as a comparison tool and saying something in ALL CAPS doesn't make it so. Some cars could game the old test and post brilliant figures but are woeful in real life. Others were much more consistent. Too early to say if the new test will be better but change was essential.

5 December 2017

Meant certain lab tests favouring some cars but being a disadvantage to other cars in the same segment.

Sorry for the rewrite

 

Hydrogen cars just went POP

5 December 2017

This is the first VW to be tested, but others have already done so and seen large increases in numbers. Any market with CO2-based taxation is going to see some large rises.


5 December 2017

Are manufacturers obliged to publish WLTP data and if so where?

5 December 2017

....Of RDE is that the analysers can be carried in the car so real world testing can actually be carried out on road rather than in a lab.   We're not there yet but things are actually moving in the right direction.

Coastdown data must also be demonstrated real world as well so there will be much less room for imaginative test procedures..... 

5 December 2017

....Of RDE is that the analysers can be carried in the car so real world testing can actually be carried out on road rather than in a lab.   We're not there yet but things are actually moving in the right direction.

Coastdown data must also be demonstrated real world as well so there will be much less room for imaginative test procedures..... 

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