Currently reading: JLR sales up 22 per cent
JLR sales boost Jaguar and Land Rover sales jumped 21.9 per cent between March and December
Autocar
News
1 min read
14 February 2012

Jaguar and Land Rover sales jumped 21.9 per cent between March and December last year, according to owners Tata. The British car maker shifted 216,412 units with strong growth in China and Russia and saw its operating profit in the final quarter leap by 62.8 per cent year-on-year.

In the period from September to December 2011, JLR sales shot up 36.7 per cent to 86,322 units much of which was accounted for by sales of the new Range Rover Evoque.

The high showroom prices being achieved by the Evoque and other models were reflected in JLR’s huge jump in revenue, up 40.9 per cent from £2.66bn to £3.75bn in the same quarter. Some 32,000 Evoques were delivered to dealers in 2011.

JLR’s operating margins in the final four months of 2011 were up a significant 20.1 per cent with operating profits up 62.8 per cent from £462m to a huge £752m.

Parent company Tata Motors saw its own revenues jump 18.2 per cent between April and December 2011. Tata Motors sold 640,334 passenger and commercial vehicles between April and December 2011 up 8.2 per cent.

Hilton Holloway

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Los Angeles 15 February 2012

Re: JLR sales up 22 per cent

Maxycat wrote:
I think you miss out the point that most of the benefit of manufacturing in a country is gained by that country through employment

See my previous post.

I am disappointed with the swiftness people forget history, even recent history. When BMW couldn't co-operate with British car workers what did they do? They agreed on a golden handshake and left with the most innovative engineering aspects of the industry they had owned but not created.

Maxycat 15 February 2012

Re: JLR sales up 22 per cent

Los Angeles wrote:
Unless I am mistaken only a handful of modest car companies such as Morgan and Ariel are wholly British owned, paying taxes in the UK. We toil under international policies designed to create wealth for a small percentage who can move that wealth anywhere in the world at the click of a computer mouse, the rest of us servers or unemployed.

I think you miss out the point that most of the benefit of manufacturing in a country is gained by that country through employment, employment taxes and the spending of the income from all those employees. Whether the company is "owned" by someone abroad or not makes little difference as most large companies shareholders are pension funds from around the world.

Los Angeles 15 February 2012

Re: JLR sales up 22 per cent

Grunt wrote:
That the group is ultimately owned by an Indian company does not matter.
I am afraid it does. The hope often expressed here is, heritage alone associated with British brands will be enough to pr!ck the concience of a foreign owner not to remove production from its traditional base. I believe that's called blind faith. So long as the cars sell well at a profit deemed acceptable there is every chance production will remain here. If that or exchange rates alter for the worst all loyalty is null and void. Remember, under today's economic policies governments are not obliged to bail out foreign owned car companies.

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