Electric vehicle sales were up 31.8% in first six months of 2016 on the same period in 2015; Britain's charging station supply will need to increase to cope with the demand

Nissan, the builder of the world’s best-selling EV, the Leaf, has predicted that the number of UK charging stations will have surpassed the number of fuel stations in just four years time.

UK demand for electric vehicles grew by a substantial 31.8% in the first six months of 2016 compared with the same period from the year before.

With 19,252 new electric cars registered in 2016 so far, Nissan believes the ‘tipping point’ for EVs is already upon us. It expects the number of charging stations being fitted to car parks to rocket as a result, and predicts that there will be some 7900 charging stations in Britain by August 2020.

Next-gen Nissan Leaf aims for 340-mile range

Consequently, the number of fuel stations is expected to decrease by this date, with Nissan predicting that there will be just 7870 fuel stations left in August 2020, representing a loss of 602 stations compared with the end of 2015.

Admittedly, Nissan is comparing the number of individual charging stations with the number of fuel stations, where several fuel pumps are available. However, there's no denying the overall trend illustrates a clear change in demand in the UK market.

Earlier this year, the Government adjusted the grant structure it offers to EV buyers, with the maximum amount reducing from £5000 to £4500. Despite this reduction in discount, EV demand has continued to grow, suggesting that other factors, such as reduced running costs and a pro-environmental image, are drawing people away from combustion-engined cars.

The Mitsubishi Outlander PHEV has been the UK’s most popular plug-in hybrid electric model, with 5738 examples of the SUV being sold over the first six months of 2016. The Nissan Leaf remains the best-selling pure-electric model, with 2336 new registrations in that same period.

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Comments
10

3 August 2016
Well once cars in the Leaf segment start hitting 200+ range I think 95% of the time they'll go for the cheaper fill it up at home option. After all we're always going on about 2p variations between petrol stations so homes with economy 7 and 10p a Kwh will save 50%+ compared to Charging stations.

 

Hydrogen cars just went POP

3 August 2016
I recently test drove an i3 and loved it. However what put me off was the woeful lack of charging points in my area. I cannot have a charger installed at home.
I do not live in a rural area but in the heart of the Thanes valley . Travel further west from here and it gets even worse. Royal Borough of Windsor and Maidenhead need to encourage more points in the area. In general the UK lags behind countries like the Netherlands and Germany

3 August 2016
Not difficult to predict when the liquid motion dispensers have disappeared from rural & local urban locations already!

...viewing the car world through cola-bottle lenses.

3 August 2016
It is totally misleading to compare the number if charging points, one car at a time, with filling stations that can on average refuel six cars or more simultaneously completely fron empty to full in two minutes whilst each charging point would take at least thirty minutes for a partial charge if they were all fast chargers.
Why xxxx continually bangs on about how cheap economy 7 overnight charging at home is a complete mystery. What percentage of electricity users have an economy 7 or similar meter installed in their home? The overnight economy tariffs only make economic sense, if you use about a third of your total consumption during the economy period as any you use at other times is charged more highly than a standard tariff. Economy 7 and similar is really only used by most if they have electric storage heating in their home.

3 August 2016
Campervan wrote:

It is totally misleading to compare the number if charging points, one car at a time, with filling stations that can on average refuel six cars or more simultaneously completely ...
Why xxxx continually bangs on about how cheap economy 7 overnight charging at home is a complete mystery. What percentage of electricity users have an economy 7 or similar meter installed in their home? ...

1. This was pointed out in the article, re-read.
2. "What percentage..", you don't know the percentage of EV users who have economy 7 at home so don't bang on it until you do. I made the point to show how much cheaper it is to charge at home on 7 or otherwise

 

Hydrogen cars just went POP

3 August 2016
xxxx wrote:
Campervan wrote:

It is totally misleading to compare the number if charging points, one car at a time, with filling stations that can on average refuel six cars or more simultaneously completely ...
Why xxxx continually bangs on about how cheap economy 7 overnight charging at home is a complete mystery. What percentage of electricity users have an economy 7 or similar meter installed in their home? ...

1. This was pointed out in the article, re-read.
2. "What percentage..", you don't know the percentage of EV users who have economy 7 at home so don't bang on it until you do. I made the point to show how much cheaper it is to charge at home on 7 or otherwise

And yet again xxxx fails to give any justification for saying that people with electric cars will benefit from cheaper overnight electricity. Unless you have electric storage heating in your home it is very unlikely you will have or want to have an economy 7 meter fitted as the daytime charge per kWh is very high and to benefit you must use a lot of electricity overnight. Furthermore most properties fitted with all electric heating tend to be apartments test are less likely to have an easy access to a cable to plug in a car.
xxxx always lets his desire to promote electric cars overcome common sense.

4 August 2016
Campervan wrote:
xxxx wrote:
Campervan wrote:

It is totally misleading to compare the number if charging points, one car at a time, with filling stations that can on average refuel six cars or more simultaneously completely ...
Why xxxx continually bangs on about how cheap economy 7 overnight charging at home is a complete mystery. What percentage of electricity users have an economy 7 or similar meter installed in their home? ...

1. This was pointed out in the article, re-read.
2. "What percentage..", you don't know the percentage of EV users who have economy 7 at home so don't bang on it until you do. I made the point to show how much cheaper it is to charge at home on 7 or otherwise

And yet again xxxx fails to give any justification for saying that people with electric cars will benefit from cheaper overnight electricity. Unless you have electric storage heating in your home it is very unlikely you will have or want to have an economy 7 meter fitted as the daytime charge per kWh is very high and to benefit you must use a lot of electricity overnight. Furthermore most properties fitted with all electric heating tend to be apartments test are less likely to have an easy access to a cable to plug in a car.
xxxx always lets his desire to promote electric cars overcome common sense.

Camp man in a van you are extremely sad! All I stated is you can get electricity for less than 10p a Kwh hour regardless of whether you live in a house or flat, you may well switch over if you have an electric car regardless of where you live. Your anti EV knows no bounds. It was a minor point but you have become obsessed, I am worried about your mental state!

 

Hydrogen cars just went POP

4 August 2016
just to shut you up got the following from the Zoe users website where people say it best to use Economy 7 "I’m with Ecotricity, so all green electricity, and I’m paying 15.76p during the day and 6.57p at night, plus £25.05 standing charge per quarter. Given how much electricity the ZOE uses, and how much cheaper it is at night, I agree with timbo that it’s an absolute no-brainer for virtually any ZOE owner to be on Economy 7 " - or do you know better than an actually EV owner

 

Hydrogen cars just went POP

3 August 2016
Green lemmings rush to the cliff's edge, determined to ignore the fact that re-charging mostly involves using electricity generated from fossil fuels.

4 August 2016
L320 wrote:

Green lemmings rush to the cliff's edge, determined to ignore the fact that re-charging mostly involves using electricity generated from fossil fuels.

Really, perhaps you'd like to give us some facts. What's the percentage of fossil fuels used in France, Germany, China, UK and are those percentages going up slowly or rapidly down?

 

Hydrogen cars just went POP

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