The brand’s German scheme is being rolled out across Europe; UK customers are the latest to get grants on models such as the i3

The UK will follow Germany as the next European country to get BMW incentives designed to attract drivers of older diesels into buying cleaner models.

Confirmed by BMW following its announcement of the scheme to German customers, BMW drivers of Euro4 and older diesels from any manufacturer a grant of up to £2000 for the purchase of a low-emitting BMW or Mini vehicle.

Models they can trade up to include full electric cars such as the i3, plug-in hybrids such as the 225xe Active Tourer and Euro6-compliant models with CO2 outputs of below 130g/km. The scheme will run until 31 December 2017. 

The company intends to expand the initiative to include several other countries in Europe, following its advent in Germany and now its extension to UK customers. A BMW spokesman explained that the incentive would also help to convince customers into alternative powertrains; the current uptake is slowed by customers' fear of the unknown surrounding the comparatively new EV and hybrid technologies

It was stressed that the scheme is not a scrappage scheme; what happens to the cars traded in is decided on a case-by-case basis, with only the lowest value being taken off the road, but BMW is looking at "the best way possible" to dispose of the trade-ins. It would then be up to individual retailers what happens to the other cars. 

BMW has recently issued a voluntary service action for some of its diesel models to issue them with new software that it claims will reduce nitrogen oxide output. BMW chairman Harald Krüger said diesel remains important in the fight to lower global emissions, despite pressure on the fuel type following Volkswagen's Dieselgate.

“State-of-the-art diesels will definitely play an important role in future mobility,” Krüger said during a recent BMW conference call to shareholders. “Modern efficient diesel engines ensure lower CO2 emissions.”

The BMW group has sold more than 50,000 electrified cars around the world so far in 2017; it's expected that the move will prompt a sharp increase in the models' sales. 

Competitors Volkswagen and Audi have also announced similar schemes, which started in Germany but are now also offered to UK customers.

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20

4 August 2017

No doubt anyone would be happy to replace an old diesel with a grant

4 August 2017
It's decent of the BMW to offer such a scheme but the noble gesture is somewhat ruined when you find out that this offer lets customers swap their old diesels with the new diesels which are almost as dirty outside the infamous European driving tests as the old diesels which we need to get off our roads. BMW has got a decent number of electrified cars; on the other hand the car makers need to shift the stinky diesels is understandable too; but there was really no need to taint a show of good intentions thus.

5 August 2017
rmcondo wrote:

No doubt anyone would be happy to replace an old diesel with a grant

but does grant know. Actually who is grant?

Spanner

5 August 2017
fadyady wrote:

It's decent of the BMW to offer such a scheme but the noble gesture is somewhat ruined when you find out that this offer lets customers swap their old diesels with the new diesels which are almost as dirty outside the infamous European driving tests as the old diesels which we need to get off our roads. BMW has got a decent number of electrified cars; on the other hand the car makers need to shift the stinky diesels is understandable too; but there was really no need to taint a show of good intentions thus.

I was behind a Range Rover diesel at the traffic lights yesterday. When it set off, there was enough black smoke to hde the number plate! These are the cars that BMW are targetting.

My recently purchased (BMW) EU6 diesel has done 1500 miles and there is no soot at all visiible in the exhaust pipes, just the metal.

It emits less CO2 than my son's 2011 318i manual and less nitrogen oxides in independent tests than my brother-in-law's Focus 1 litre turbo, so I don't feel that I am endangering the planet.

The discount and performance also helped my decision - £14k off a pre-registered car and 0 to 62 in 4.8 seconds.

 

 

5 August 2017

Or does it just show how grossly overpriced the cars are. What this means is that they can still make a profit and take less of our money.

it's a bit like buy one get one free, which is buy one, and get one you have already paid for.

it's called a sales incentive, and using the word "grant" to hide this I find disingenuous.

Spanner

5 August 2017

Isn't that nice of BMW, to offer people a way of boosting BMW's sales.

5 August 2017
Bob Cholmondeley wrote:

Isn't that nice of BMW, to offer people a way of boosting BMW's sales.

Since when did BMW become a charity?

10 August 2017

So basically BMW are giving you a £2,000 grant on a £25,000+ car if you trade-in your euro 4 diesel (for £1000 less than they would’ve anyway probably). Opposed to you getting a £4,000 discount for cash or just plain haggling.

Nice one BMW, charity really does begin at home

 

Hydrogen cars just went POP

10 August 2017
xxxx wrote:

So basically BMW are giving you a £2,000 grant on a £25,000+ car if you trade-in your euro 4 diesel (for £1000 less than they would’ve anyway probably). Opposed to you getting a £4,000 discount for cash or just plain haggling.

Nice one BMW, charity really does begin at home

BMW are giving £2000 IN ADDITION to whatever the part exchange value would otherwise be, e.g. if the car is worth £4000 you would get £6000 under this scheme. The customer also qualifies for all incentives and discounts that would normally be available.  And for any clever git out there who thinks the dealers will undervalue the part exchange, BMW have explicitly told the network that they will lose the £2000 support the customer has been given if the car is not valued at a minimum industry standard level

10 August 2017
veedubya wrote:

xxxx wrote:

So basically BMW are giving you a £2,000 grant on a £25,000+ car if you trade-in your euro 4 diesel (for £1000 less than they would’ve anyway probably). Opposed to you getting a £4,000 discount for cash or just plain haggling.

Nice one BMW, charity really does begin at home

BMW are giving £2000 IN ADDITION to whatever the part exchange value would otherwise be, e.g. if the car is worth £4000 you would get £6000 under this scheme. The customer also qualifies for all incentives and discounts that would normally be available.  And for any clever git out there who thinks the dealers will undervalue the part exchange, BMW have explicitly told the network that they will lose the £2000 support the customer has been given if the car is not valued at a minimum industry standard level

Sorry but there's always deals to had and offering around 8% discount "for a limited period" is all to common these days and doesn't amount to that much (dealers always offer a high trade in price anyway but then you have to pay a high price for the new car, 8% saving will just get lost). A euro 4 owner might be bettter off by a £1,000 but at the end of the day it's just a VERY limited offer. If it was that great imagine how cash, petrol owners and 'buy on finance people' would feel about subsidizing Euro 4 owners.  

I'd be surprized if there'd be that many Euro 4 diesel owners (pretty old tech these days) that would be in the market for a new £25,000 car anyway.

With the Model 3 and next gen Leaf heading to Europe soon'ish it's the very least they can do to shift the slow selling i3, and they know it.

 

Hydrogen cars just went POP

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