Subaru has priced the XV from £24,995, making it considerably pricier than an entry-level T-Roc or Ateca, which start at £18,950 and £18,670 respectively. In its most basic form, the XV is powered by a 1.6-litre boxer engine, which Subaru claims will account for only a small portion of overall sales in the UK.

There are two trim levels to choose from in the UK: SE and SE Premium. Standard equipment is fairly strong, with all models gaining an 8.0in touchscreen, Apple CarPlay and Android Auto, LED headlights, hill descent control and Subaru’s EyeSight suite of safety equipment for no extra cost.

Simon Davis

Simon Davis

Road tester
The availability of a torquier diesel engine and manual transmission would make this a much more appealing proposition in the crossover market.

That spec level, plus the provision of an automatic gearbox and four-wheel drive as standard, partly explains the high starting price. SE Premium models gain satellite navigation, leather upholstery, sunroof and power adjustable driver’s seat.

Depreciation is unfortunately forecast to hit the XV fairly hard. Our top-spec 2.0-litre SE Premium model – which starts at £28,495 – is predicted to retain only 40% of its value after 36,000 miles and 36 months of ownership, which will be hard for many private buyers to stomach. A comparable petrol-powered Ateca, meanwhile, is expected to retain 51% of its value over the same time frame.

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