Throughout the early 2000s, Peugeot struggled and largely failed to make cars that not only looked good but also gave the driver something to relish from behind the wheel. However, the 3008 suggested that things might be on the turn, and the 5008 continues the trend.

Obviously, neither the 3008 nor the 5008 is overtly dynamic, but neither are they supposed to be. What they do both manage is to feel comfortable and controlled on the road, without being sporty. They’re at least capable of satisfying and quietly impressing the attentive driver, without giving him or her anything to get excited about.

The energy-saving Michelin Primacy tyres offer reasonable grip

Given that the 5008 is based on the same platform and shares the same purpose as the Citroën C4 Grand Picasso, the particularly gratifying thing is that it retains most of the comfort of the Citroën, but sheds its sister car’s soggy, lethargic attitude to anything other than a dead straight road.

The Peugeot’s ride is good enough to be considered on a par with the comfortable Renault Grand Scénic, but it has more consistent steering and more composure to its body movements.

The Peugeot has commendable body control, supple damping, and communicates fluently via its electrohydraulic power steering system – something that is becoming a rarity in new cars, and is a welcome find. A Ford S-Max is still a more athletic and engaging family car, but then the Ford has dynamic abilities way beyond those expected of an MPV. The 5008 simply meets the class’s ride and handling standards, without smashing them.

The 5008 is generally refined, too, with wind and road noise that remain restrained even at motorway speeds. High-speed stability is fine and, combined with well weighted and accurate steering, makes the 5008 a doddle to drive over long distances.

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