From £29,3108

C 63 AMG models aside, there is only one trim in the Mercedes C-Class coupé, so it’s just a case of picking from the three petrol and two diesel engines and choosing your options.

By the standards of the class, the C-Class range is competitive, especially next to the BMW 3 Series line-up. But the Audi A5 makes it look a touch expensive, even if it lags a bit on standard kit. But generally the C-Class coupé looks to offer competitive acquisition and running costs, plus very decent residuals. Few could expect more.

The coupé is competitively priced and offers good running costs

As for the economy, it is the diesels that are of most interest. Somewhat strangely, the C 250 CDI model gives nothing away to the C 220 CDI in economy and CO2 emissions despite its extra power and torque.

The economy and emissions of the diesels are clearly very good – even with the optional £1500 seven-speed automatic transmission fitted. In fact, at 53.3mpg and 139g/km, these are just about the best numbers you’ll find among the Merc’s auto-equipped rivals, so it’s easy to see why the C 220 CDI model is expected to be popular with fleet buyers who want something rather more interesting than the usual family wagon but with sensible running costs.

Be careful with the throttle and you’ll see some excellent economy in the C 220 CDI. On our touring route, which replicates a 70mph motorway cruise, we returned a very creditable 56.6mpg, and we regularly returned more than 40mpg.

Economy figures are also impressive in the petrol models, the C 350’s 40.4mpg economy and 155g/km CO2 emissions of particular note.

Economy – or price - doesn’t really come into it with the AMGs, particularly with the fearsomely expensive Black Series. For the record, the most potent C 63 returns 23.2mpg, but don’t expect to see that if you drive it the way it’s supposed to be driven.

 

Advertisement
Advertisement

Find an Autocar car review

Find an Autocar car review