From £90,8609
A drive on UK roads confirms what we already knew about Jaguar's top-end F-type coupé, namely that it's one of the best sports cars around

Our Verdict

Jaguar F-Type R

The powerful Jaguar F-Type R is sensational to drive, with even better driving dynamics than its lesser siblings without resorting to the savage tendencies of the SVR

  • First Drive

    Jaguar F-Type SVR 2017 review

    Light updates for the 2018 model year Jaguar F-Type SVR do little to change the car’s character
  • First Drive

    2016 Jaguar F-Type SVR UK

    We've driven the Jaguar F-Type SVR in the UK. What does this 567bhp range-topping brute have to offer, seeing as it costs more than £100,000?

What is it?

The Jaguar F-type R coupé – on home soil. Previous to this, we’ve only had the chance to sample the range-topping new model abroad, and mostly on track; now it must live up to the promise of those previews on somewhat less glamorous surfacing. 

It’s fair to say the omens are good. Alongside glowing praise from Messrs Sutcliffe and Cropley, the R has had Jaguar’s chest puffed out for months. In case you missed the fanfare, the manufacturer has repeatedly described it as its most performance-focused production car ever. 

Big words, backed, it must be said, by some fairly big numbers. The coupé inherits Jaguar’s all-aluminium 5.0-litre supercharged V8 in its XFR-S spec – meaning a car some 300kg or so lighter than the aforementioned saloon yet with the same 542bhp and 502lb ft. Or, put another way, more than you’d get from an Audi R8 V10. 

Significantly more than you’d get in the open-top F-type V8, too. Yet – as we’ve repeatedly been told – that’s okay because the aluminium roof has made it a very different prospect. The most torsionally rigid production Jaguar ever built, in fact. And one with the second generation of the firm's E-diff and, for the first time for a Jaguar, torque vectoring. 

What's it like?

Heavenly. Bonkers as well, of course – when you want it to be. But also comfortable, usable and never less than memorable. Which is a special and particularly thrilling mix for a road car and one we haven’t seen Jaguar properly resolve since the original XFR. 

First, because it’s what you’ll notice immediately, the bonkers bit. The R is fast. Frantically, spankingly fast. The data box will tell you it’s half a second tardier to the national speed limit than a 911 Turbo, but it doesn’t feel it. What if feels, courtesy of the V8’s relentlessness, is just this side of anti-social. Click the adaptive exhaust button, however, and it’ll merrily cross that line, too. 

Crucially, however – and here the stiffness starts to show – there is no incongruity lurking in the huge performance. Where the roadster’s chassis could seem overawed by the supercharger’s drawl, the R squats and grips and goes with a newfound oneness. The pyrotechnics and associated noise of a floored throttle can be appreciated from the get-go – and that’s important both to driver confidence and a wider appreciation of the better balance both Steves have already alluded to. 

That same poise, magnified by a Surrey B-road, is what makes the pace doubly compelling. The overall dynamic picture is recognisable as the same understeer-immune, pliably agile and rear-end-adjustable package already successfully established as ‘F-type’ in nature, but its limits, precision and manageability have all been moved up a notch. What seemed precarious in the roadster is now brilliantly practicable. 

Second – and possibly better still – is the ease and convenience with which it can all be packed away. In the R there is clearer definition now between the button-activated Dynamic mode and its mild-mannered counterpart; selecting the latter frees the dampers to take greater advantage of their more rigid setting and lets the chassis properly breathe. The jostle of 20-inch wheels isn’t completely eradicated, but with the superb eight-speed ZF automatic gearbox back in D, the car manages a supercruise as well as any of its rivals. 

Should I buy one?

Certainly. The V8-engined roadster was only previously recommended with a host of provisos, but the coupé deletes almost all of them. Added to which, the better-reconciled R finally makes a top-spec F-type look like decent value for money. Starting at £85k puts it firmly in 911 Carrera S territory, and, measured side by side, the reasoning suddenly isn’t hard to fathom. 

Not only are you buying a car endowed with considerably more power, but you’re also getting one capable of competing head on with the Porsche’s high-grade comfort, class and handling entertainment. Furthermore, it probably won’t have escaped anyone’s notice that the F-type coupé is quite extraordinarily pretty. It hardly needed that kicker, but here it is. Advantage Jaguar. 

Jaguar F-type R coupé

Price £85,000; 0-60mph 4.0sec; Top speed 186mph; Economy 25.5mpg; CO2 259g/km; Kerb weight 1650kg; Engine V8, 5000cc, supercharged, petrol; Power 542bhp at 6500rpm; Torque 502lb ft at 3500rpm; Gearbox 8-spd automatic

Join the debate

Comments
8

8 May 2014
Driving a sports car must IMO factor 'fun' 'sense of occasion' and 'sense of feeling good' highly once the dynamics are sorted. Comparing this to its obvious rival,it has it beaten, no doubt. If I were in the market for spending £80k - £140k (but no more) It'd be between this and the Vantage V12 S.

8 May 2014
Absolutely love this car and is the top of my list of cars of the moment. Judging by the review, Jaguar have made a very fine car indeed which can be seen as a superb alternative to the Porsche 911, Audi R8 & Aston Martin Vantage to name but a few. What a great place to be if you are fortunate enough to be in a position to buy any of those cars. Is it a better car than the 911, probably not, but if the Porsche is a 10, then the F-Type at the very least, is a 9 in my book

8 May 2014
Good review but pictures disappointing,where are proper pics of the interior and the luggage space ? can you get golf clubs in ? I know it is batter than the joke the convertible is.Will be interesting to see how the new Mercedes-AMG GT compares.

Madmac

8 May 2014
Much as I love the Jaguar F-type, with its beautiful looks and Britishness, its seems foolish to spend the extra cash when you could buy a Porsche Cayman GTS for 30 grand less!

8 May 2014
carmad wrote:

Much as I love the Jaguar F-type, with its beautiful looks and Britishness, its seems foolish to spend the extra cash when you could buy a Porsche Cayman GTS for 30 grand less!

I was about to post the same thing.

8 May 2014
jamesf1 wrote:
carmad wrote:

Much as I love the Jaguar F-type, with its beautiful looks and Britishness, its seems foolish to spend the extra cash when you could buy a Porsche Cayman GTS for 30 grand less!

I was about to post the same thing.

Er, if you adopt that line of logic, its actually foolish to buy any one of those cars; not only are they impractical, but they are likely to suffer from depreciation like a dropped rock, hence the small numbers of these cars sold to date.

It all comes down to what you really desire, and for many it'd be the Jaguar F-type for the way it looks, way it sounds, and its exceptional road manners. The Cayman hasn't been able to shake it's 'poor mans 911' image and I doubt the GTS will change that.

8 May 2014
jamesf1 wrote:
carmad wrote:
Much as I love the Jaguar F-type, with its beautiful looks and Britishness, its seems foolish to spend the extra cash when you could buy a Porsche Cayman GTS for 30 grand less!
I was about to post the same thing.

The problem with the above is after option on the Cayman GTS you would get a car that costs the same as the Jaguar but is a slower and uglier

8 May 2014
This car is much more special than the Cayman or 911 and has the handling nailed in most driving situations. The only case for the Cayman is the possibillity of a manual box, but if you are going for an auto anyway the Jag is much more appealing.

ofir

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