Sales success has come to the Focus for more than one reason. Enthusiasts will think of sharp steering and deft body control, but a decent range of engines, fine practicality, striking looks and a distinguishing price are more likely to have endeared the car to the majority.

Those latter facets – combined with a smarter cabin, more economical engines and new  gadgets – will stand this new version in better stead than ever for most.

Matt Prior

Matt Prior

Road test editor
The facelifted Focus is improved in all ways bar one. It's appealing, but no longer excels dynamically

However, the slow decline of the Focus’s handling dynamism has brought it back to the melee of mid-class contention when it used to be head and shoulders clear. The Focus handles very tidily, and better than most of its peers, but not with the uncanny polish and verve that set its forebears apart.

The refreshed Focus is improved in all ways bar one. It's still a very appealing, complete car. However, an undistinguished drive means it no longer excels dynamically, which means its lagging behind the evergreen Volkswagen Golf overall and less compelling to drive than the Seat Leon.

Sportier flavours of the car are far superior with the ST and RS models offering the poise and feedback that keen drivers would be able to relate with. But, we must acknowledge that the Focus is still appealing as ever, even if the driving allure has been eroded from the first gen Focus.

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