From £17,695
The Orlando is yet another sign that Chevy is taking Europe a lot more seriously
Autocar
23 October 2010

What is it?

The Chevrolet Orlando sounds like the sort of low-grade saloon you'd rent at an American airport. In fact, it's yet another sign that Chevy is taking Europe a lot more seriously.

It's a seven-seat MPV, first seen at last month's Paris motor show, and going on sale next March as a cut-price rival to the VW Touran and the Vauxhall Zafira.

Like the Chevy Cruze and the Vauxhall Astra the Orlando is built up GM's global Delta platform, albeit with a wheelbase stretched by 85mm. When it goes on sale next March it will be available with a 139bhp 1.8-litre petrol engine, and two 2.0-litre diesels in differing states of tune. The top-line one puts out 161bhp.

What's it like?

For practicality the Orlando looks like making a good fist of cutting it with the likes of the new Ford Grand C-Max and the Zafira, GM's in-house rival. In fact when you start playing with the Orlando's seats it's the Zafira that instantly springs to mind as it has a similar seating system. So the middle row bench splits, tilts, tumbles forward and lies flat in the same way.

The two individual rear seats are also buried in the boot floor too, allowing you to extract them when needed, or keep a much more cavernous boot. It's pretty spacious too, even if that low roofline forces a mild penalty in your perception of head clearance. The reality is that only the super-tall will be troubled by it.

Up front there's further proof that Chevy's quality is on the up. Everything feels as tightly constructed as the latest Vauxhalls - some of the same switchgear too - and so it works well and is comfortable.

On the move there's more similarity. The Orlando is another Delta platform car so it uses the same underpinnings as the Astra and Cruze, albeit with a wheelbase stretched by 85mm. We drove two of the three engines on offer, a 161bhp diesel and a 139bhp 1.8-litre petrol. Buy the diesel if you want anything approaching punch and high-speed refinement.

On our billiard table-smooth test track it was impossible to make ride judgments but body movement felt well controlled, although numb steering ruins the fun.

Should I buy one?

We'd be tempted to see what it rides like in the UK before fully committing. But there's no doubt that the Orlando's got visual appeal. It works well as a mid-sized seven-seater and it will be well priced. In short, another good step forward for Chevys sold in Europe.

Chas Hallett

Chevrolet Orlando 2.0 diesel

Price: £17,800 (est); Top speed: na; 0-60mph: na; Economy: 47.1mpg; CO2: na; Kerb weight: na; Engine: 4 cyls, 1991cc, turbodiesel; Power: 161bhp at 3800rpm; Torque: 266lb ft at 2000rpm; Gearbox: 6-spd manual

 

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nimmler 31 October 2010

Re: Chevrolet Orlando

giulivo wrote:
And "ridiculous" is with an i

EXCUSE ME . Are you the spelling police?

Correcting people on the Internet because of a minor spelling mistake?

Seriously pal YOU have issues.

fhp11 29 October 2010

Re: Chevrolet Orlando

Leslie Brook wrote:
I often wonder about the 2 rear most seats on these compact MPV's. Euro NCAP tests front and side impacts but I'm not sure about the rear. It would appear that the rear head rests are practically touching the back window meaning you nearest and dearest are effectively the rear crumple zone

Its a really relevant point. I too would like to see Euro Ncap implement some rear tests. I think the test should simulate the impact of a van or SUV hitting the rear and the corresponding effect on an adult and child rear passenger.

These compact MPV's arent great for it but are by no means the worst. At least, like the with Chevrolet that you can see here, the rear seat ends before the external structure of the car begins. I believe there is around 10 inches between the back of the rear headrest and the external screen on the Orlando.

The worst car for it by far is the Toyota IQ, had the chance to have a look in one the other day and it was frightening. I couldnt even fit my hand between the back of the headrest and the rear window. In an accident, the rear passengers head is surely coming off. The rear passengers safety relies on the fact that there is no rear chassis deformation at all in the event of an accident, and yes, it has a rear airbag, because of course the bodywork of the vehicle behind will be stopped by your glass window and a pillow of air.... right....... For this reason, I would never myself or let any of my family travel in the rear of a Toyota IQ, I don't even like Aygo's, C1's etc for the same reason by teh IQ is terrible. With cars like these on the market, it really is time that NCAP introduced some tests showing the effects of rear end collisions.

And Below is a modern and safe Volvo V70 in a rear end crash. Still fancy your chances in the rear of an IQ? I dont even fancy my chances in the front of an IQ in a rear collision.

Volvo  Cop that: Volvo puts a plug-in hybrid V70 wagon through a rear-end sled crash test in its research into electric vehicle safety.

Leslie Brook 29 October 2010

Re: Chevrolet Orlando

I often wonder about the 2 rear most seats on these compact MPV's. Euro NCAP tests front and side impacts but I'm not sure about the rear. It would appear that the rear head rests are practically touching the back window meaning you nearest and dearest are effectively the rear crumple zone.

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