From £17,6957

Traditionally, cheap entry prices may have been a strong point for a car like the Chevrolet Orlando, but the whole owning experience often fell down at resale time. The evidence suggests, however, that things should be rather better in this case.

The Orlando is still marginally cheaper, like-for-like, than its nearest rivals, but sales are likely to be limited by supply, which will do residual values no harm. After three years, it should retain close to the 40 per cent of its list price - a typical figure in this class. CO2 output is not its strongest suit, but the benefit-in-kind tax for business choosers is offset somewhat by the lower list price.

Andrew Frankel Autocar

Andrew Frankel

Senior contributing writer
The entry-level LS model isn’t especially well equipped

Economy of the diesels is nothing to write home about either. In the 1.8 petrol that dips down considerably, although the benefit in kind level is the same. That could add up to quite a saving if you can live with the petrol engine.

The entry-level LS model isn’t especially well equipped. For example, it only gets a tiltable steering column, while other models get steering that adjusts telescopically as well. There are no alloy wheels or iPod connectivity, either. Top-spec LTZ models comfortably undercut rival range-toppers from Ford, Peugeot and Renault and are fairly decently equipped with 17-inch alloys, climate control, and automatic headlights and wipers. Satellite navigation is a reasonably-priced option, too.

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